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    The Regenerative Journey podcast is a must for anyone who is curious about regenerative agriculture and the wide ranging and significant benefits of its adoption and practice, not just for farming communities but also for anyone who eats food and cares for the planet!

    In each episode, Charlie takes the listener on his guest’s regenerative journey as he uncovers their inspirational stories, touching on topics including the regenerative agriculture definition, natural capital, the psychology of transitioning to regenerative farming practices and principles, and partnering with Nature.

    The first series launched in May 2020 with the support of Landcare Australia and was shortlisted in the Best Interview category for the 2020 Australian Podcast Awards – quite some feat indeed.

    To date we have had over 450k downloads with our audience tuning in from across Australia and further afield. We are seeing an increasing interest from listeners in the USA, Europe and South America to name but a few.
    Be sure to tune in to Season 5 which got under way in Mid March – there are some cracking interviews to get your teeth into, enjoy!

    Patreon

    What’s Patreon all about ? To help us keep our journey on track so to speak, we have decided to launch a Patreon page. Creating a Patreon community gives any listener who feels that they might like to help contribute to the running costs of the podcast, the opportunity to do so in return for some exclusive members only perks; which include interview transcripts & webinars where you can chat directly to Charlie and his guests.

    To learn more about our Patreon offering, please click New call-to-action & sign up to our Patreon community.

Episodes

  • Ep 63 | Bruce Pascoe

    Charlie’s guest for the final episode of Season 5 is Bruce Pascoe. This episode was recorded in late May in Sydney where Charlie was honored to interview Bruce ‘live’  as part of the Fairlight Butcher’s series of events featuring renowned thought leaders from the world of regenerative agriculture. Settle in for this fascinating episode in which Bruce shares w/ Charlie the ebbs and flows of his  regenerative journey – it’s an absolute ripper of an interview.

    Episode Links:

     

    and finally…. we’ve teamed up RCS  to help nurture and facilitate your regenerative journey. RCS are offering you a 10% discount on all of our Grazing for Profit, Farming and Grazing for Profit, courses and online and face to face Grazing Clinics in Australia this year.  If you add this to the early bird rate of a 7-day school, you could get a whopping $1000 off the standard price!

    Simply click here and add CHARLIERCS at the checkout to get your concession.

    T&Cs – You must book or register your EOI by the end of June 2022 to be eligible for the discount | Each person can only use the code once | Offer applies to courses in 2022 only

  • Ep 62 | Jay Marinis

    Charlie’s guest for this episode of TRJ is Jay Marinis. Jay is on a mission to recreate the essence and culture of a traditional ‘Public House’ in the Adelaide Hills – to bring together community into a hub of food gardening, mental health therapy, cultural exchange and social change. Jays enthusiasm is inspiring, as is his conversation with Charlie at the centre of his project, the 153 year old Scenic Hotel.

    Episode Links:

    The Scenic Hotel – pub in Norton Summit, Adelaide Hills (SA)

    Son of Dot Drinks – FB page wine wholesale business founded by Jay

    Top Soil Garden Project  – FB page

    Bundarra Berkshires – Naturally farmed, ethnically raised pork

    Nomad Farms – multi-award winning family owned & run farm,  Finniss Valley on the Fleurieu Peninsula (SA)

    Youth Inc – a new learning alternative designed for young people aged 17-24.

    Ben Shewry –  chef and owner of the Melbourne restaurant, Attica

    and finally…. we’ve teamed up RCS  to help nurture and facilitate your regenerative journey. RCS are offering you a 10% discount on all of our Grazing for Profit, Farming and Grazing for Profit, courses and online and face to face Grazing Clinics in Australia this year.  If you add this to the early bird rate of a 7-day school, you could get a whopping $1000 off the standard price!

    Simply click here and add CHARLIERCS at the checkout to get your concession.

    T&Cs – You must book or register your EOI by the end of June 2022 to be eligible for the discount | Each person can only use the code once | Offer applies to courses in 2022 only

  • Ep 61 | John & Kym Kalleske

    Charlie’s guests for this episode of TRJ are 6th & 7th generation farmers John & Kym Kalleske. John & Kym have successfully combined traditional farming family values, Biodynamic farming practices and innovative modern wine making on their farm in the Barossa Valley in South Australia. Their products speak volumes of their commitment to quality and community, as does their close intergeneration relationship with Kym’s wine making brothers Tony and Troy

    Episode Links:

    Kalleske Wines 

    Kalleske Farm

    Four Leaf Milling

    Dr. Arden Ardenson – author of various books available via Acres USA

    and finally…. we’ve teamed up RCS  to help nurture and facilitate your regenerative journey. RCS are offering you a 10% discount on all of our Grazing for Profit, Farming and Grazing for Profit, courses and online and face to face Grazing Clinics in Australia this year.  If you add this to the early bird rate of a 7-day school, you could get a whopping $1000 off the standard price!

    Simply click here and add CHARLIERCS at the checkout to get your concession.

    T&Cs – You must book or register your EOI by the end of June 2022 to be eligible for the discount | Each person can only use the code once | Offer applies to courses in 2022 only

  • Ep 60 | Rose Kentish

    Charlie’s guest for this episode of TRJ is Rose Kentish. Rose is an enigma – combining her love of making wine that captures the flavours and perfume of landscape and terroir, with social change, species preservation, regenerative farming and climate action. She is a woman ‘for purpose’ just like her beverage company Sparkke.

     

    Episode Links:

    Rose Kentish Wines 

    Sparkke 

    Full Circle Spirits 

    Pago Middleton – Rose and Sam’s idyllic hideaway

    Rose Kentish – article

    Ulithorne –  C.W. Wines | McLaren Vale

    and finally…. we’ve teamed up RCS  to help nurture and facilitate your regenerative journey. RCS are offering you a 10% discount on all of our Grazing for Profit, Farming and Grazing for Profit, courses and online and face to face Grazing Clinics in Australia this year.  If you add this to the early bird rate of a 7-day school, you could get a whopping $1000 off the standard price!

    Simply click here and add CHARLIERCS at the checkout to get your concession.

    T&Cs – You must book or register your EOI by the end of June 2022 to be eligible for the discount | Each person can only use the code once | Offer applies to courses in 2022 only

  • Ep 59 | Arne Rubinstein

    Charlie’s guest for this episode of TRJ is Arne Rubinstein.

    Arne Rubinstein started his professional life at the coal face of youth trauma and misadventure in several Emergency Rooms in regional NSW. Through his own research, observations and investigations, Arne identified a critical stage in the development of our youths was missing -a traditional and public Rite of Passage. Charlie explores Arne’s own regenerative journey into the world of this lost cultural ritual and development of a modern version.

    Episode Links:

    Dr Arne Rubinstein

    Rites of Passage Institute

    Iron John – book by Robert Bly

    Bringing Back the Butchulla, Indigenous rites of passage – Youtube video

    The Archetype of Initiation – book by Robert L Moore

    Pathways Foundation 

    and finally…. we’ve teamed up RCS  to help nurture and facilitate your regenerative journey. RCS are offering you a 10% discount on all of our Grazing for Profit, Farming and Grazing for Profit, courses and online and face to face Grazing Clinics in Australia this year.  If you add this to the early bird rate of a 7-day school, you could get a whopping $1000 off the standard price!

    Simply click here and add CHARLIERCS at the checkout to get your concession.

    T&Cs – You must book or register your EOI by the end of June 2022 to be eligible for the discount | Each person can only use the code once | Offer applies to courses in 2022 only

  • Ep 58 | Angelica Arnott

    Charlie’s guest for this episode is his beautiful wife Angelica.

    Charlie has many and varied interesting discussions with his wife Angelica and decided it was about time to share them with the world….or at least her own regenerative journey from model, pop singer, and actress to farming life. Angelica’s values and attitude to healthy lifestyle and living has been a significant influence on Charlie’s own regenerative journey.

     

    Episode Links:

    Braiding Sweetgrass – book by Robin Wall Kimmerer

    Landmark Education – personal and professional growth network

    Recipes for a Kinder Life – book by Annie Smithers

    and finally…. we’ve teamed up RCS  to help nurture and facilitate your regenerative journey. RCS are offering you a 10% discount on all of our Grazing for Profit, Farming and Grazing for Profit, courses and online and face to face Grazing Clinics in Australia this year.  If you add this to the early bird rate of a 7-day school, you could get a whopping $1000 off the standard price!

    Simply click here and add CHARLIERCS at the checkout to get your concession.

    T&Cs – You must book or register your EOI by the end of June 2022 to be eligible for the discount | Each person can only use the code once | Offer applies to courses in 2022 only

  • Ep 57 | Bert Glover

    Charlie’s guest for this episode of TRJ is Bert Glover.

    Through family challenges and plenty of on farm experience, Bert Glover has created a business that allows farmers to leverage the Natural Capital of their farms, and attract capital investment into the regenerative farming space. Charlie caught up with Bert at the Maia Grazing field day for this insightful interview.

    Episode Links:

    Impact Ag – Bert is the Co-Founder

    Maia Grazing

    The man in the Glass – poem

    Ray Hunt horse clinic

    Trillion Dollar Coach – book by Eric Schmidt

    and finally…. we’ve teamed up RCS  to help nurture and facilitate your regenerative journey. RCS are offering you a 10% discount on all of our Grazing for Profit, Farming and Grazing for Profit, courses and online and face to face Grazing Clinics in Australia this year.  If you add this to the early bird rate of a 7-day school, you could get a whopping $1000 off the standard price!

    Simply click here and add CHARLIERCS at the checkout to get your concession.

    T&Cs – You must book or register your EOI by the end of June 2022 to be eligible for the discount | Each person can only use the code once | Offer applies to courses in 2022 only

  • Ep 56 | Bart Davidson

    Charlie’s guest for this episode of TRJ is Bart Davidson. Bart has traversed a career in agriculture all his adult life and there are not many people Charlie knows who have such a broad skill set and experience in the agricultural industry, even rarer considering Bart was not born into a farming family.

    His regenerative journey started with ‘the trout that changed the world’ at age 5, through ecological studies, agronomy, organic certification, rigorous data collection & analysis, and holistic farm management. He possesses the rare combination of both instinctive feeling and analytical thinking.

     

    Episode Links:

    Bart Davidson 

    RCS

    Maia Grazing 

    The Wizard and The Prophet – book by Charles Mann

    Dr. Elaine Ingham – Soil Food Web School

    BFA Cert Organization

    Power of One – book by Bryce Courtney

    Vipassana meditation

    and finally…. we’ve teamed up RCS  to help nurture and facilitate your regenerative journey. RCS are offering you a 10% discount on all of our Grazing for Profit, Farming and Grazing for Profit, courses and online and face to face Grazing Clinics in Australia this year.  If you add this to the early bird rate of a 7-day school, you could get a whopping $1000 off the standard price!

    Simply click here and add CHARLIERCS at the checkout to get your concession.

    T&Cs – You must book or register your EOI by the end of June 2022 to be eligible for the discount | Each person can only use the code once | Offer applies to courses in 2022 only

  • Ep 55 Part 2 | Terry McCosker

    This is Part 2 of Charlie’s marathon interview with the Godfather of regenerative Australian agriculture Terry McCosker. This episode focuses on Terry’s development of holistic farm management in an Australian context, the vision of RCS Australia, Natural capital, the convergence of agriculture, human and planetary health, and subtle energies.

    Episode Links:

    Terry McCosker – founder RCS

    Resource Consulting Services Australia 

    RCS  Conference 2022 – Convergence Agriculture | Human & Planetary Health

    Toastmasters – NFP Organisation

    Churchill Fellowship – Learn Globally, Inspire Locally

    Carbon Link – A Complete End-to-End Soil Carbon Company

    Dr. Patrick MacManaway – Psychic and healing arts practitioner

    Love Money, Money Loves You – book written by Sarah McCrum

    Grazing For Profit Course – RCS

    Landmark Forum 

    Dr Zach Bush

    and finally…. we’ve teamed up with RCS  to help nurture and facilitate your regenerative journey. RCS is offering you a 10% discount on all of it’s Grazing for Profit, Farming and Grazing for Profit courses, as well as it’s online and face to face Grazing Clinics in Australia this year.  If you add this to the early bird rate of a 7-day school, you could get a whopping $1000 off the standard price!

    Simply click here and add CHARLIERCS at the checkout to get your concession.

    T&Cs – You must book or register your EOI by the end of June 2022 to be eligible for the discount | Each person can only use the code once | Offer applies to courses in 2022 only

  • Ep 55 Part 1 | Terry McCosker

    Charlie’s guest for this episode of the TRJ is Terry McCosker. After a few false starts and nearly a 2 year wait Charlie finally sat down with Terry in the Brisbane City Botanic Gardens for a marathon 3 hour conversation. In this first part Terry leads us through a character strengthening childhood, finding his agricultural focus and the challenges of moving counter to prevailing paradigms.

    Episode Links:

    Terry McCosker – founder RCS

    Resource Consulting Services Australia 

    RCS  Conference 2022 – Convergence Agriculture | Human & Planetary Health

    Toastmasters – NFP Organisation

    Churchill Fellowship – Learn Globally, Inspire Locally

    Carbon Link – A Complete End-to-End Soil Carbon Company

    Dr. Patrick MacManaway – Psychic and healing arts practitioner

    Love Money, Money Loves You – book written by Sarah McCrum

    Grazing For Profit Course – RCS

    Landmark Forum 

    Dr Zach Bush

    and finally…. we’ve teamed up with RCS  to help nurture and facilitate your regenerative journey. RCS is offering you a 10% discount on all of it’s Grazing for Profit, Farming and Grazing for Profit courses, as well as it’s online and face to face Grazing Clinics in Australia this year.  If you add this to the early bird rate of a 7-day school, you could get a whopping $1000 off the standard price!

    Simply click here and add CHARLIERCS at the checkout to get your concession.

    T&Cs – You must book or register your EOI by the end of June 2022 to be eligible for the discount | Each person can only use the code once | Offer applies to courses in 2022 only

  • Ep 54 | Glen Carlson

    Charlie’s guest for Episode 54 of the TRJ is Glen Carlson. Charlie caught up with Glen on his new farm to explore his regenerative journey. Its clear his 7 years at sea circumnavigating the globe with his parents as a boy set up attitudes and behaviours that have stood him in good stead through his fascinating business life of developing personal brands, and scaling up businesses. And his observations of the similarities between the principles of regenerative agriculture and his own business principles is refreshing to say the least.

    Episode Links:

    Glen Carlson

    Key Person of Influence – book, written by Daniel Priestley & Mike Reid

    Dent Global

    Tony Robbins 

    Mike Harris  – author

    The Dent podcast

    KPI Accelerator programs – global program

    and finally…. we’ve teamed up RCS  to help nurture and facilitate your regenerative journey. RCS are offering you a 10% discount on all of our Grazing for Profit, Farming and Grazing for Profit, courses and online and face to face Grazing Clinics in Australia this year.  If you add this to the early bird rate of a 7-day school, you could get a whopping $1000 off the standard price!

    Simply click here and add CHARLIERCS at the checkout to get your concession.

    T&Cs – You must book or register your EOI by the end of June 2022 to be eligible for the discount | Each person can only use the code once | Offer applies to courses in 2022 only

  • Ep 53 | Nat Kelley

    Charlie’s guest for Episode 53 of the TRJ is Nat Kelly. Nat Kelley is a Peruvian born Australian actress who has made a name for herself in Hollywood not just for her acting but also for her sincere and impassioned support of indigenous cultures around the world and the advocacy of regenerative farming and soil building practices. Charlie interviewed Nat at Hanaminno on one of her quick trips back to Australia from the US.

    Episode Links:

    Nat Kelley

    Quechua

    Kiss the ground Soil and their advocacy course

    Fantastic Fungi

    Nat is on the board of The Fungi Foundation

    Founder of Fungi Foundation is Paul Stamets

    Ayni -Peruvian concept of reciprocity

    Rest River Blue –  movie

    Who What Where  – TV show

    Laaso clothing brand

    TEK Traditional ecological knowledge-Low TEK  – book by Julia Watson

    Lila June Johnson – activist

    Children’s ground 

    Fire sticks 

    and finally…. we’ve teamed up RCS  to help nurture and facilitate your regenerative journey. RCS are offering you a 10% discount on all of our Grazing for Profit, Farming and Grazing for Profit, courses and online and face to face Grazing Clinics in Australia this year.  If you add this to the early bird rate of a 7-day school, you could get a whopping $1000 off the standard price!

    Simply click here and add CHARLIERCS at the checkout to get your concession.

    T&Cs – You must book or register your EOI by the end of June 2022 to be eligible for the discount | Each person can only use the code once | Offer applies to courses in 2022 only

  • Ep 52 | Charlie Arnott

    Charlie opens TRJ Season 5 with some reflections on the period of time between podcast seasons, announcing some of his future guests, the exciting collaboration with regenerative farm training and advisory business RCS Australia and thoughts on the year ahead.

    Episode Links:

    RCS Australia

    Parents with Questions

    and finally…. we’ve teamed up RCS  to help nurture and facilitate your regenerative journey. RCS are offering you a 10% discount on all of our Grazing for Profit, Farming and Grazing for Profit, courses and online and face to face Grazing Clinics in Australia this year.  If you add this to the early bird rate of a 7-day school, you could get a whopping $1000 off the standard price!

    Simply click here and add CHARLIERCS at the checkout to get your concession.

    T&Cs – You must book or register your EOI by the end of June 2022 to be eligible for the discount | Each person can only use the code once | Offer applies to courses in 2022 only

  • Ep 51 | Jon Farriss

    Charlie’s guest for the final episode of Season 4 is Jon Farriss. Jon Farriss, drummer of world famous Australian band INXS, has always done his own thing, teaching himself drums at an early age, pioneering the use of computer modulated music software, and shifting his talents to regenerating a farm near Byron Bay, NSW. Charlie traverses Jon’s fascinating journey of purposefulness through the many chapters of his life.

    Episode Takeaways:

    Jon was born in Perth WA where he taught himself to play drums, before moving to Sydney at age 17 to pursue his music career | Others experiences help inform others | Jon is a great believer in creating one’s future and dedicated his life to doing so, and put this attitude down as a critical reason for his success | That and his curiosity and courage to go against the system and status quo | Jon was one of the first on the block to use computer-sequencing software in the mid to late 80s. By integrating digital sampling and electronic augmentation early on, he solidified his trademark ‘locked in like a machine’ drumming style | Being in a flow state was a phenomena Jon often experienced and it was in this state where he said he and his band mates did their best work. Being in the moment is very important to Jon | Being able to adapt to the nuances of each show is critical, and similar to the way that regenerative farming requires one to adapt the the nuances of season and landscape | 2012 was INXS last performance | After some time at Jervis Bay in NSW South Coast Jon and his family moved to the Byron Bay hinterland, where Jon and his wife Kerry homeschooled their children for some time | Bird watcher | Jons connection with Nature is very strong now that he is on a farm and adapting to its own Nature | More recently Jon collaborated with Ciaran Gribbin to create JAK music, and from that union a song called ‘We Are Awakening’ which we feature at the end of this episode | Jon’s battle with alcohol ended in 2008 when he stopped drinking | Jon’s appreciation and use of subtle energies with the help of Dr Patrick Macmanaway and Kim Kiss has he[ped strengthen his relationship with his farm and landscape | Jon understands we’ve strayed away from what used to be understood and utilized from an energetic point of view.

    Episode Links:

    Jon Farriss 

    INXS 

    Patrick Macmanaway – Subtle energy facilitator 

    Kim Kiss – RCS Landscape Subtle Energy Consultant

    Show Promo – The Nutrition Academy – quote CHARLIE100 at checkout  to receive $100 off Functional Nutrition Course

  • Ep 50 PT 2 | Adam Gibson

    This is the second part of Charlie’s interview with business development guru Adam Gibson. In Part 2  Charlie and Adam take a deep dive into Adam’s involvement in regenerative agriculture and how this involvement has grown in recent years. From Adam’s passion for helping others nurture & grow their sustainable food & regenerative business ideas via his ‘venture catalyst’ enterprise, to his role as a facilitator and key linchpin in joining the dots in the ever evolving space of regenerative agriculture, Charlie & Adam dig deep in this not to be missed ‘thought’ provoking episode.

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways:

    Adam teaches overcoming our fears with questions like ‘Is it true?’ in reference to  framing our perspective with facts which in turn helps shift paradigms | VRM is a product that Adam is associated with, they have been engaged by the Chinese government to transform 20,000,0000 acres of farmland over the next few years, as they know they have a food quality problem looming. Their food system is failing | We need to get away from unnatural inputs | Sovereignty of our farms, health and lives is cornerstone of Adam’s values and a principle that he teaches | The current medical system is also broken and is at odds with providing good service and advice | It’s not the health industry, it’s the sickness industry | Until the government starts speaking with as much fervor about health options that support good health and immune building as they are about mandating experimental injections for people of all ages, Adam isn’t taking notice of them | Censorship now a problem, as people are now being able to express themselves and engage their right to free speech, and people can’t make informed decisions if all the facts and options are not available for them to consider |  Since recording this interview Adam has been instrumental in creating a website called Parents with Questions which aims to prompt parents and anyone who cares about children to ask better questions about the safety of the experimental injections approved by the TGA for 5-18 year olds.

    Episode Links:

    Adam Gibson 

    Venture Organic – founded by Adam Gibson

    Wild Idea Incubator – founded by Adam Gibson

    Cultivate farmsis a social enterprise which matches the best next generation aspiring farmers with retiring farmers and investors to own and operate a farm

    TelegramTelegram is a freeware, cross-platform, cloud-based instant messaging (IM) system.

    Signal Signal is a free, privacy-focused messaging and voice talk app

    duck duck go browserThe Internet privacy company that empowers you to seamlessly take control of your personal information online, without any tradeoffs.

     Parents with Questions – Is the Covid-19 vaccine right for your child?

    Show Promo – The Nutrition Academy – quote CHARLIE100 at checkout  to receive $100 off Functional Nutrition Course

  • Ep 50 PT 1 | Adam Gibson

    Charlie’s guest for this episode is business development guru Adam Gibson. Adam Gibson grew up on a small bush block in SE Qld, and over the next 35 years owned a gym, competed in body building competitions, mentored natural health business and ‘went to the edge’ before finding himself back on the land and knee deep in bringing together the vital components of farmers, skills, land and capital investment.

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways:

    Adam grew up on small bush block in SE Qld | First foray into entrepreneurship was selling chicken manure from a local poultry shed | Adam bought a gym with his father when he left school. It was a passion project more than a sound financial plan | He was Natural Junior Mr Australia in 1992 | Adam is a strong believer in the essential alignment of one’s work with their passion and ‘genius’ | Attending a Landmark forum course changed his life. It made him understand that he had a choice to change his life or continue on his current path | Adam started a Natural Health business coaching and mentoring program to help practitioners develop entrepreneurial skills in their businesses | He found them to be passionate but not business minded and he helped them focus on value not volume | Diet is an essential component in health, and no matter what health modality practitioner he helped, the first step is to focus on the patients diet | One of Adams focus’s now is to be able to provide fresh nutritious food to his kids | When Adam found his way into the regenerative agriculture world he was interested to find that there was little cohesion and coordination of all the moving parts, and decided to use his business coaching skills to help pull together some of the threads to connect farms, farmers, skills and investors | He has worked with Cultivate Farms to achieve this.

    Episode Links:

    Adam Gibson 

    Venture Organic – founded by Adam Gibson

    Wild Idea Incubator – founded by Adam Gibson

    Cultivate Farms

    ‘The Big Leap’ – book | author Gay Hendricks

    Global Success Academy – founder Paul Blackburn 

    Landmark Forum Course

     VRM Biologique

     Parents with Questions – Is the Covid-19 vaccine right for your child?

    Show Promo – The Nutrition Academy – quote CHARLIE100 at checkout  to receive $100 off Functional Nutrition Course

  • Ep 49 | Gabrielle Chan

    Gabrielle Chan’s media and journalism background combined with her ‘opposition defiance disorder’ has seen her challenge political and rural issues with curiosity and persistence, resulting in a unique perspective on how the two intersect. Sitting in her garden in rural NSW Charlie explores with Gabrielle this intersection including how farmers can influence the political landscape by the decisions they make regarding their natural landscape.

    To join our Patreon community New call-to-action – Patreon patrons receive exclusive access to webinars and transcripts + a range  of other perks in the making!

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways:

    Gabrielle never thought she would  live on a farm having grown up in suburban Sydney | She had bushland behind their house so did have contact and connection to ‘the bush’ | Gabrielle has a self diagnosed lifelong case of ‘Opposition Defiance Disorder’! | Curiosity drives her to want to question and understand concepts, which lead her to her first job in media as a ‘copy girl’ at News Limited, then at the Australian and Telegraph newspapers | She worked in New York at the Canadian consulate before working as the Press Secretary for politician Peter Collin, then finding her way back into journalism and the media industry | She published ‘Rusted Off – Why Country Australia is Fed Up’  (2018)  in which she tells the story of Australia as it is today, as she looks to her own rural community’s main street for answers to the big questions driving voters. Why are we so fed up with politics?  | She believes food buying decisions impact our health directly and the farm environmental health indirectly | We can’t separate the farm story and practices from the food quality | Transparency is essential to make decisions for both human and environ health |  We have to adapt to changes in economic, environ, social, demand etc. | Carbon accounting is a relatively new and significant opportunity for farmers to be remunerated for the ecological value they generate Politics designs legislation and regulation, farmers need to engage in that process to influence the outcomes | The Social Contract that farmers have ‘signed’ has changed from a production focus to environmental focus | Governments are now looking closer at subsidies etc. that focus on environmental services and less about production | Gabrielle is irate about farmers and indigenous land managers no being involved in climate debate | Her billboard quote would be ‘it’s the food stupid’ on one side and ‘it’s the land stupid’ on the other.

    Episode Links:

    Gabrielle Chan 

    Gabrielle Chan Twitter : @gabriellechan

    The Guardian Rural Network – Gabrielle is the Regional & Rural  Editor 

    Why You Should Give a F*ck About Farming – Gabrielle Chan’s recently published book ( 2021)

    Rusted Off – Why Country Australia is Fed Up – Gabrielle Chan book published 2018

    Regen Farmers Mutual –  A farmer-owned business which is focused on creating the digital infrastructure, transaction processes and governance structures that enable farmers to optimize Environmental, Goods & Services outcomes. Director Andrew Ward

    Vince Heffernan – biodynamic lamb producer, NSW

    Show Promo – The Nutrition Academy – quote CHARLIE100 at checkout  to receive $100 off Functional Nutrition Course

  • Ep 48 | Andy Carbone

    Charlie chats with Andy Carbone, General Manager of the Farm at Byron Bay in the latest episode. Andy Carbone started his life on a Central Queensland cattle station before trying his hand at acting, screen writing and film directing. A career and life change that stood him in good stead for a number of challenges that he would face on his own journey, which lead him to the world of regenerative farming.

    To join our Patreon community New call-to-action – Patreon patrons receive exclusive access to webinars and transcripts + a range  of other perks in the making!

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways:

    Charlie met with Andy at The Farm at Byron Bay where Andy is the general manager | Education is a big piece of the offerings at The Farm | Andy’s ancestors settled in Central Qld in the mid 19th century and he grew up on a station there | His father was from an Italian farming family and his grandmother a bee-keeper there | His parents separated when he was young and he went away to boarding school in Brisbane | After school he spent time in the Channel Country in Queensland working a number of cattle stations | He then enrolled for a Fine arts degree in Acting In Brisbane with no prior experience | His father was in the film industry in the70-80s and dissuaded Andy from working in the industry. Andy wanted to prove to him that he could make it in that world. | Andy wrote and directed the film ‘Shooter’ film, filmed at Boorowa, NSW | The film was Andy’s contribution to the mental illness in regional areas conversation and issue | His father took his own life in 2020 | Charles Massy’s book ‘Call of Reed Warbler’ had a profound impact on Andy | Andy was managing farms in the Southern Highlands of NSW before his role at The Farm when he started to look into the practices of regenerative farming | Instinct and a strong connection to the landscape are important to Andy’s relationship with Nature | A Silent meditation retreat was a turning point for Andy in his personal development.

    Episode Links

    The farm at Byron Bay – Andy is the GM 

    ‘Waiting for Rain’ ( 2016) &’ Shooter’ ( 2017) – short films Andy has directed

    Hell West and Crooked – book | author Tom Cole

    Call of the Reed Warbler :  A New Agriculture  – book | author Charles Massy

    TALS – The Australian Landscape Science Institute

    Tarwyn Park Training– leading Natural Sequence Farming training provider

    Grazing For Profit (GFP) | RCS – the longest running business school for Ag, Aus

    Oliver’s Hens  – Oliver’s eggs can be bought at Mullumbimby Farmers Market, NSW

    Biodynamics Workshops – see Charlie’s events page for latest dates

    Show Promo – The Nutrition Academy – quote CHARLIE100 at checkout  to receive $100 off Functional Nutrition Course

  • Ep 47 | Nick Mace

    In this episode Charlie chats to Nick Mace. Nick  and his young family are currently transitioning their mixed enterprise farm in western NSW to more regenerative practices, primarily initiated by a health scare some years ago which has changed the way they engage with Nature, graze their livestock, steward their landscape and feed their children. A wonderful interview for anyone currently or wanting to start their own regenerative journey.

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    Episode Takeaways:

    Grew up on Wilga Park near Walgett, NSW on a conventionally farmed family farm | Traditionally sheep country, and gradually has moved to mixed farming area over many years | Nick feels the country is better suited to trading stock more than breeding | Nick was educated at boarding school before a year at Legune Station on the Northern Territory/Western Australia border | Nick was completing a building apprenticeship in Sydney when a tragic accident in his family prompted his move back to the family farm | Cyndi O’Meara has been a great inspiration to Nick | It’s important to teach kids good habits when they are young | A serious health scare sent Nick on a new path of focusing on his own health which lead to a change of many practices in his paddocks | His father has always been open minded to trialing different methods of farming and his mother has always helped build the bridge through the transitioning period on the farm | Nick’s wife Alix, has created ‘The Rural Women’s Collective’ Facebook group which is ‘for rural women who want to optimize their health, wellness and business so they can thrive where they are.’ | Nick’s experimenting with a crimp roller on some of his pasture | Nick has different measures of success than he did when conventionally farming, one being ‘ less is more’ | He has changed his approach, working with his resources, and seeing weeds as a resource not a problem | He is currently transitioning his farm to organic certification and Biodynamics is now also a focus, as is biodiversity | Brent Burns of Landsave Organics has been an inspiration to Nick | Nick has considered constructing an exclusion fence around his property to keep out kangaroos, that can make a huge impact on pasture growth and availability of feed to his cattle and sheep | Nick is keen to give peppering a go to help control his kangaroos | Nick is a big fan of researching farming practices to justify his decisions | Nick is always learning from the challenges he has faced.

     

    Episode Links:

    Nick Mace IG 

    The Rural Women’s Collective FB group – founded by Alix Mace

    Legune Station – NT, Aus

    Institute of integrative nutrition 

    Cyndi O’Meara & Changing Habits 

    Landsave Organics 

    The Meter Man –  Brix meter : looking after your soil 

    Weston fence – exclusion fencing  

    Peppering – weed and pest control 

    Biodynamics workshops – regular workshops throughout Australia 

    Grazing For Profit  – RCS course

    Inside Outside Management – Brian Wehlburg founder

    Show Promo – The Nutrition Academy – quote CHARLIE100 at checkout  to receive $100 off Functional Nutrition Course

     

     

  • Ep 46 | Marcus Pearce

    In this episode Charlie chats to his good friend Marcus Pearce. Marcus Pearce was not necessarily destined for a life of health and wellness. However meeting his wife Sarah, a stint at veganism, a fascination with longevity & quality of life, and collating his research into his new book ‘Your Exceptional Life’ has put him squarely in that space. Marcus is an expert and advocate of such phrases as ‘make the rest of your life the best of your life’ and ‘do what you love and love what you do’.

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    Episode Takeaways:

     

    He is the author of recently published book ‘Your Exceptional Life’ | Marcus grew up in Melbourne and was a sports journalist after school | His wife Sarah is a chiropractor & lead him down the path of health and wellness | They moved to Byron Bay in 2014 | Knowing your farmer is very important to Marcus and acknowledges the strong link between food, health and connection with Nature | His mum is 1 of 15 children! Marcus and Sarah attended a Tony Robbins event called ‘Unleash the Power Within’ which was a turning point in their lives | Both Marcus and Sarah were Vegan for 6-7 years primarily in response to the need to contribute to healing the planet | A John Demartini event made them consider their health and position on veganism and started to introduce meat back into their diet | Cyndi O’Meara has been a big influence on Marcus | Eating at the table with family is very important | Those that have an empowered view of aging die 7.5 years later than those that don’t | Marcus questioned his paradigms with research and experience | The art of life is both human doing and human being | Do what you love and love what you do | Social interaction is an essential event of life | Australia is 4th on ladder of longevity and 15th for quality of life | Icaria is a Greek island, one of the ‘Blue Zones’ on earth, and when Marcus heard about the longevity of locals there he became fascinated with what it was that gave them such longevity. He has taken a number of groups there to experience their way of life | Blue Zones are essentially regions of quality and longevity

    Marcus breaks up ‘Your Exceptional Life’ into 3 sections. Your exceptional Longevity , Quality of life and Spirit | Gardening is a consistent element to longevity and quality of life | Research has shown if one has a distant or strained relationship with their parents they are very likely to have midlife medical crisis | Marcus is irate about the sense of restriction to travel and social interaction due to lockdowns | Make the rest of your life the best of your life.

     

    Episode Links:

    Marcus Pearce website

    Your Exceptional Life – Marcus Pearce book

    100 Not Ou Podcast – Marcus Pearce podcast 

    The Wellness Couch Podcast – Marcus Pearce podcast

    The Farm – Bryon Bay, NSW 

    Olivers Hens – sold at Mullumbimby Markets, NSW

    Harris Farm Markets 

    Unleash the Power Within – Tony Robbins

    Tony Robbins – business analyst, author & philanthropist 

    Dr. John  Demartini –  human behaviour expert

    Cyndi O’Meara (Ep 26) The Regenerative Journey Podcast 

    Cyndi O’Meara – Nutrition Academy

    ‘Healthy at 100’ – book John Robbins author

     ‘How to Win Friends &  Influence People’ –  book Dale Carne

     

     

     

     

     

  • Ep 45 | Amelia Nolan

    In this episode Charlie chats to Amelia Nolan. Amelia Nolan represents a new breed of wine maker, one with no preconceived notion of ‘the right way to make wine’, willing to explore the artisanal craft of natural wine making, initiating regenerative farming practices in the vineyard and combining it all with cutting edge technologies to create wine truly expressive of the site specific terroir of the vineyard in the Barossa Valley.

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    Episode Takeaways

    Amelia has 30 years in the wine business | Amelia grew up on a farm at Naracoorte and her father was a 3rd generation sheep farmer | She studied at Roseworthy Agricultural College , worked at Hardys and moved to the UK with the company who then merged with Constellation Brands an American drinks producer and marketing company | She was diagnosed with a rare ovarian cancer at age 33 which changed her perspective on life significantly, and believes her illness was necessary to redirect her path in life | She currently is managing director at  Alkina Wine Estate in The Barossa valley for Argentinian Alejandro Bulgheroni | The Barossa Valley was settled in the 1830-50’s primarily by Germans | Alkina Wine Estate has a history with well known wine makers Peter Lehman and the Kalleske family- with links to both | Amelia has learnt that often it’s what one does less of that makes the difference | An example is utilizing wild yeasts in the wine making process | She had no previous experience in making wine so didn’t have paradigms to get over | She is experimenting with more natural winemaking techniques | Terroir – how soil and rock informs texture and taste | Her head wine advisor Alberto Antonini has introduced the use of electrical conductivity scanning of the whole farm and digging soil pits to identify specific layers of parental materials of rock, clay, sand and silt layers | Amelia is determined to create wines that truly represent the terroir of their vineyard and picking grapes and making wine as defined by the parental material in which the vines is growing enables this | The dryness of SA and Barossa has inspired Amelia and her team to increase the resilience of the vineyard | There are a number of habitat restoration programs in place, one specifically for the native blue banded bee | 11,500 specific insect species on the farm, which is a wonderful indicator of environmental health | David Paxton was their first viticulture advisor and Alkina has been certified Biodynamic since 2018 | Biodynamics is a big part of building soil health | The phrase ‘80% of something is better than 100% of nothing’ really resonates with Amelia | She recognises the potential of the indigenous landscape wisdom to help heal this vineyard and is creating a relationship with local elder Auntie Pat and others | If Amelia could put 2 words on a billboard beside a busy highway they would be:  ‘optimism’ and ‘gratitude’

     

    Episode Links

    Alkina Wine Estate – Barossa, South Australia

    Alkina, Barossa – where history, wine & luxury meet – The  Weekend Australian ( 21.08.21)

    Alejandro Bulgheroni – owner Alkina Wine Estate 

    Alberto Antonini – wine maker & owner of Poggiotondo Wines, Italy

    Hardys Wines 

    Constellation Brands

    The Polygons – Alkina wine range

    David Paxton – Founder/ owner Paxton Wines

    Native blue banded bee 

     

     

     

  • Ep 44 | Michael Taylor

    In this episode Charlie chats to Michael Taylor. Michael Taylor is from a multigenerational farming family in the New England region of NSW and is continuing his parents legacy of innovation, agroforestry and ethically produced fine merino wool production. Diversity of enterprises and biodiversity of ecology and landscape is a focus of Michaels, as demonstrated by the resilience of his farm ‘Taylors Run’ and the businesses he operates.

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    Episode Takeaways 

     

    Michael lives at Taylor’s run near Armidale, in the New England region of NSW | The Taylor family settled in the area in 1839, with 6-7 related Taylor families still living in the area | Michael had taken land for granted as a child and grew up planting trees, camping and having a very normal country childhood | He studied and worked in Melbourne for 10 years after school | His parents are very creative which is evident as the innovative enterprises and development of the farm | The Taylor family have long been involved in research programs and studies on property regarding biodiversity and natural capital accounting | Michael has been hesitant to step into the carbon market given the covenants that are generally required on the land involved and associated agreements  | Michael has worked with Master Tree grower and agroforestry expert Rowan Reid | A wood shortage may result in Michaels timer plantations being even more valuable for commercial building timber than they currently are as habitat and ecologically | Benefit of timber stands and grazing management evident in droughts, with less wind erosion, sustained habitat, and ground cover | Taylor family are pioneers in on-farm forestry and ran ‘tree fest’ in 1992 to showcase their work, 6-8,000 people attended | Dabbled with Natural Sequence Farming theory and holding water in the landscape is now a priority | Pasture is a major part of agroforestry | Agroforestry isn’t readily recognised by search engines with the term being lumped into general forestry | The word silvopasture has been developed to help bring together all things associated with trees and farms | Master Tree Growers Course held at Taylor’s farm | Bill Funk oak collector | Michael and family went to live in France for a year – a time of much reflection | 2019 drought really hammered home how much soil had been lost in recent years | Michael’s parents gave him the tools and his grandparents the inspiration | 

     

    Episode Links 

    Michael Taylor – The Land article ( 2019)

    silvopasture.com.au

    Rowan Reid – Australian Master Tree Grower

    Heartwood – author Rowan Reid

    Mahoe timber cutter 

    New England Agriwoodland network  

    Frog Dreaming Storytelling event – Armidale, NSW

    Tarwyn Park Training – Natural Sequence Farming Facilitators

    Silvopasture  – author Steve Gabriel

    Guardians of the Grasslands – central Canada 

    Silvopasture 2021 Webinar – Part 1 –  hosted by SNEL 

    Silovopasture 2021 Webinar – Part 2 – as above

    Master Tree Growers Courses

    The Barefoot Investor – Scott Page 

    Bill Funk – Oak collector

     

     

  • Ep 43 | Rebecca Sullivan

    In this episode Charlie chats to Rebecca Sullivan. Rebecca Sullivan grew up in a family with conventional attitude to food, and a life changing incident at an Italian feast rocked her appreciation and reverence for food culture and tradition, setting her on a trajectory of championing the rights of farmers, rediscovering long forgotten food traditions and the creation of a co-culture indigenous food production business.

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    Episode Takeaways

    Rebecca and her partner Damien Coulthard live on a small farm near Clare in South Australia near where she grew up | Their farm represents a project of regeneration | Rebecca grew up in a very conventional food culture | She travelled to London for 6 weeks after school and stayed for 10 years| She worked in sports journalism and PR in the UK | A significant turning point in her life was eating a traditional ‘live maggot’ Italian cheese called Casa Marzu in Italy, when she realized the importance of food culture and tradition to the strength of a community | She became a activist for farmers almost immediately and worked on many food festivals and initiatives before realizing her activis was too preachy | She worked with many legends of the emerging food world, such as Jamie Oliver Hugh Fearnley -Whittingstall, Michael Pollan, Dan Barber and Alice Waters | Closer to home she has worked with Maggie Beer, Stephanie Alexander, Rodney Dunn &  Séverine Demanet, Costa Georgiadis, Bruce Pascoe, Charlie Massy, Palisa Anderson  | She was inspired by her great grandmother who was an award winning baker in UK in the 1930s, and created Granny Skills when she returned to Australia | Met Damien and felt fraudulent in her appreciation and understanding of really ‘traditional’ foods | Created Warndu, a ‘co-culture’ business growing, supporting and selling indigenous products | Plants are a great way to reset and engage in a relationship with indigenous culture | She is irate that government hasn’t been more proactive re bushfires and indigenous use of fire | A Climate Resilient Community Project and development of Warndu Co-operative are her next big projects

     

    Episode Links

    Rebecca Sullivan website 

    https://warndu.com/

    Warndu Mai  – The Cookbook – Damian Coulthard & Melissa Sullivan

    Granny Skills link and link to her books 

    Jamie Oliver – British chef

    Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall –  Award winning writer & broadcaster. Founder of  River Cottage 

     Michael Pollan – author

     Dan Barber – American chef & restaurateur

     Alice Waters –  American chef & restauranteur

    Rodney Dunn & Séverine Demanet – chefs & founders / owners of the Regrarian Kitchen, TAS

    Costa Georgiadis – Australian landscape architect & broadcaster

     Bruce Pascoe – Australia author of  Dark Emu

     Charles Massy – regenerative farmer and author of Call of the Reed Warbler 

    Palisa Anderson – author of Boon Luck Farm  (IG-her and Book Luck Farm)

    Collaboration w/ Haigh’s Chocolate

    Show Promo – The Nutrition Academy – quote CHARLIE100 at checkout  to receive $100 off Functional Nutrition Course

  • Ep 42 | Melissa Brown

    Charlie caught up with Melissa Brown during one of his ‘Introduction to Biodynamics’ workshops that Melissa was hosting at her Biodynamic vineyard in the McLaren Vale region of South Australia. Melissa’s dedication to working in partnership with nature, to produce extraordinary wine and to teach her customers the principles & practices of organic farming is inspiring. This interview is a must for anyone wanting to understand how working with nature & focusing on soil is the key to regenerative farming.

     

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    Episode Takeaways 

    Melissa lives on farm at Gemtree Wines near McLaren Vale at base of Mt Lofty Ranges | Her connection to that land is deep and important to her and her business | Her grandfather established the vineyard in the year Melissa was born | Mike her husband and winemaker started to make wine from their own grapes when he joined the business | Vineyard now Just over 300 ac | In 2005 Melissa started to look at organic practices | A visit to a health retreat on Kangaroo Island started her on a journey of awareness for human and environmental health. Her father was nervous about relying on Biodynamics for fertility and also the removal of chemical use for the control of weeds | David Paxton of Paxtons wine inspired Melissa | Melissa had an attitude of application and experimentation to transition to using organic and Biodynamic principles in the vineyard | Sheep are very important for weed management within the vines | Spring and autumn Biodynamic preparation sprays are of Horn manure 500 and Cow Manure Concentrate (when moon descending), and 501 (when moon ascending) | ‘Gemtree eco trail’ has been created by Melissa and Mike, which involved the planting of 50,000 native trees in an existing habitat corridor. They have also established an interactive area and tours near cellar door to demonstrate Biodynamics | Gemtree support a Koala rescue program and have a special enclosure for rescued koalas to be rehabilitated | Melissa puts poor food quality down to the current poor physical, spiritual and mental state of mankind

     

    Episode Links 

    Melissa Brown – interview w/ Melissa ( www.younggunofwine.com)

    Gemtree Wines – family owned & operated winery, McLaren Vale, SA

    Tasting Australia – annual event . 2022 dates are : 29th April – 8th May 

    Cullen Wines – biodynamic winery, WA

    Paxton Wines – David Paxton is the founder & owner. Winery, McLaren Vale, SA

    Southern Koala Rescue Foundation 

    Maria Thun – information on Maria Thun, her books & calendar

    Show Promo – The Nutrition Academy – quote CHARLIE100 at checkout  to receive $100 off Functional Nutrition Course

  • Ep 41 | Stuart Austin

    Stuart Austin is fast becoming an expert and well respected advocate of building soil carbon, as well as a well known practitioner of regenerative farming on the collection of Wilmot Cattle Co properties Charlie caught up with Stuart to delve into his journey from farm boy in Southern NSW, ringer from the top end of Australia, recruiter of ranch hands in Canada, to general manager of the Wilmot Cattle Company in NSW.

     

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    Episode Takeaways

    Stuart grew up near Albury on small farm, and Stuart’s grandfather was a very influential figure as teenage in his life | First job after school was at Newcastle Waters in the Northern Territory | A big turning point in Stuart’s life was at age 21 when he read the book ‘You Inc.’ (link) by John McGrath, which prompted much inner reflection and created many new positive habits, like setting goals | Stuart recognizes the importance of language and how one treats people – People Matter Most | He also acknowledges the challenges for women in agriculture to have a career and raise children too | In Canada he worked in ‘guest ranches’’ until he started farm recruitment business | Attended Marcus Oldham College | Started at Wilmot as manager in Sept 2016 | Stuart has struggled with mental health and supports the organization ‘Trade Mutt’ who are a social impact workwear brand making funky eye-catching workwear designed to start conversations about mental health, helping make an invisible issue impossible to ignore | Give staff ownership of ideas | Pride and ego are our 2 most limiting factors, and get in the way of making better decisions | Through grazing management Wilmot is taking a huge amount of carbon out of the atmosphere | The co benefit of the grazing management practiced at Wilmot Cattle Co properties  is the sale of carbon credits | Stuart can’t recommend more highly the impact attending the RCS ‘Grazing for Profit’ course has done for his personal and business development | Be kind is what Stuart would write on a highway billboard

     

    Episode Links 

    Wilmot Cattle Co – Stuart is GM

    Maia Grazing – online grazing management tool

    ‘You, Inc.’ –  book author John McGrath

    TradeMutt workwear

    Maia Grazing webinar interview w/  Stu Austin – May 2020

    Show Promo – The Nutrition Academy – quote CHARLIE100 at checkout  to receive $100 off Functional Nutrition Course

  • Ep 40 | Tammi Jonas

    Charlie’s guest for this episode is Tammi Jonas. From hunger strikes at university to becoming the president of the Australian Food Sovereignty Alliance, Tammi Jonas has always fought for the rights of others. In this episode Charlie explores Tammi’s colourful history of advocacy and food production. She is a beacon of inspiration for anyone wanting to create their own self sufficient farming enterprise, as experienced by Charlie whilst visiting Tammi at Jonai Farms in country Victoria for this episode.

     

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    Episode Takeaways

    Interview done at Jonai Farm in Victoria in her Belvedere- ‘room with a beautiful view’, which is nestled under a volcano! One of Tammi and Stuarts principles is using materials others think is waste to use on their farm, to feed their stock and grow their veggies |  They began by producing for themselves and now, produce pork, beef and garlic to sell to clients | Jason from Teurong farm | Tammi was raised in Oregon California and had an awakening at university of ethics and animal welfare | Also an awakening to food and politics | Met Stuart in London after withdrawing from Uni. in US | She started eating meat again after suffering anemia with 3rd pregnancy | She realized she needed bioavailable iron from well raised meat | Joel Salatin inspired them to farm and start with pigs | Tammi was drawn to the country and Stuart wanted to leave the city | Learned the hard way to plan infrastructure first before bringing in animals | Better to be proactive than reactive | Stuart and Tammi share complimentary skills of hard science (Stuart) and life science (Tammi) | Tammi is stepping into the Indigenous food and culture space now and contributes to the Pay the Rent initiative | Tammi is a supporter for the importance of biodiversity in agriculture as an observer at the UN Convention of Biological Diversity | Agroecology favours labour over capital | State government should devolve and deregulate their powers in relation to local food systems | Charlie Massy is a mentor of Tammi’s | Tammi is a great supporter of on farm abattoirs.

    Episode Links 

    Tammi’s website 

    Australian Food Sovereignty Network – Tammi is the network’s current President

    Farming Democracy: Radically Transforming the Food System from the Ground Up – written by Tammi Jonas, Paula Fernandez Arias, Katarina Munksgaard 

    Teurong farm – farm in Vic,  growing and milling ancient grains 

    https://paytherent.net.au/ – a NFP encouraging the payment of money back to the indigenous people. All ‘rent money’ is spent to directly benefit Indigenous people and communities.

    Seeing Like a State’ – author James C Scott

    Call of the Reed Warbler –  author Charles Massy

    Sand Talk – author Tyson Yunkaporta

    Show Promo – The Nutrition Academy – quote CHARLIE100 at checkout  to receive $100 off Functional Nutrition Course

  • Ep 39 | Maggie Beer |

    Charlie’s guest for this episode is Maggie Beer.

     

    Maggie Beer is one of Australia’s best known cooks, fresh food advocates, rural community supporters, and on farm restauranteur icons. Charlie caught up with Maggie at her home in The Barossa Valley, surrounded by quince, citrus and medlar trees, to explore a life filled with passion, energy, flare and a tenacious will to feed people good old fashioned farm produce.

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    Episode Takeaways

    Music plays a big part in her life | The choir who gather at her home every Wednesday night gives her energy! | Maggie is famous for her quince paste with her first quince orchard planted 35 years ago | Quince is a staple fruit tree in the Barossa at old farm houses | She and husband ( Colin)  moved to the Barossa Valley 48 years ago where they found a natural reverence for food in the Barossa | She grew up in western suburbs of Sydney and left school at 14 | Colin’s  vision was to farm pheasants and Maggie was going to make wine | A farm shop in Scotland inspired Colin to have his own on the farm | Maggie, who was never taught to cook, started the farm shop which morphed into a restaurant, utilizing food from their farm and surrounds | Colin is sensible, practical and good with figures while Maggie is the driven one | Mediterranean climate inspired her to cook Mediterranean food and dishes and grow those trees and foods | A turning point was in 1991 when they won the the Remy Martin Cognac – Australian Gourmet Traveller Restaurant of the Year award | They were an overnight success, but Maggie was burning out | Colin gave her an ultimatum, its either me or the restaurant! So Maggie retired from the farm kitchen 4 months later | Her great friend and supporter Stephanie Alexander has rolled out her cooking program to 2000 schools in Australia | The Maggie Beer Foundation was established in 2014 to improve the food experiences for older Australians, particularly those living within aged care homes – ‘Everything you do for me you take away from me’ | Maggie is irate about – regional mental health and suicide levels | She was the senior Aust of the year in 2010 | She is excited about SA!

     

    Episode Links

    Maggie Beer – products

    Maggie Beer’s Farm Shop 

    Maggie Beer Foundation

    Maggie Beer’s Orchard House – B&B

    The Great Australian Bake Off – Foxtel Show hosted by Maggie and Matt Moran

     Pheasant Farm Restaurant ( now closed) Remy Martin Cognac – Australian Gourmet Traveller Restaurant of the Year 1991

    Kitchen Garden Foundation – Stephanie Alexander initiative 

    Alkina Wine  – Barossa Valley, SA ( location of the Tasting Australia Long Lunch May 5th ) 

    Tasting Australia – 2022 dates 29th April to 8th May

    The Great Australian Cook Off – Matt Moran & Maggie Beer both 

    Show Promo – The Nutrition Academy – quote CHARLIE100 at checkout  to receive $100 off Functional Nutrition Course

  • Ep 38 | Charlie Arnott | The Times… They Are Changing!

    In the first Episode of Season 4 our podcast host Charlie Arnott picks up the mic and provides a preview of what’s in store for Season 4 including information about some of his illustrious guests that will be joining him in the coming months. Charlie also takes to his soap box to talk about the highly topical Covid19 situation currently being felt Australia wide..

    To join our Patreon community New call-to-action  – Patreon patrons receive exclusive access to webinars and transcripts + a range other perks in the making!

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    Episode Notes: 

    As Charlie eludes to in this episode, we would love your feedback on a couple of things please…

    Podcast Awards 2021 – let us know which was your favourite episode in Season 3 and in doing so help us choose which interview to submit in the ‘Best Interview’ category for the 2021 awards !  Hurry, we need to know by the 13th Sept latest – Submit your choice New call-to-action

    Rapid Fire !! We would love to hear what questions you would like us to include in our short’ n sharp Q & A session which is a new feature this season for our Patreon members. Submit your questions New call-to-action

    Episode Links: 

    Charlie’s website

    Australian Podcast Awards 2021

    The Farm @ Bryon Bay, NSW

    Oliver’s Hens  – eggs can be bought from  Mullumbimby markets

    Maggie Beer –  chef, author &  Charlie’s guest Episode 39

    Tasting Australia – SA event held  annually in May

    Stuart Austin – GM  Wilmot Cattle Co | Series 4 guest 

    Wimot Cattle Co  – Microsoft purchase carbon credits | Feb 2021 

    Amelia Nolan –  MD Alkina Wine Estate,  Barossa Valley SA | Series 4 guest

     Melissa Brown – Co – Founder Gemtree wines, McLaren Vale, SA | Series 4 guest 

    Episode 13 | The Regenerative Journey | Peter Windrim – download & listen here

    Cultivate Farms – supporting more people onto the land 

    The Truman Show – film ( 1998) starring Jim Carey

    IPCC Climate Report ‘Code Red for Humanity’  – August 2021

    Rebecca Sullivan –  Founder Granny Skills | Series 4 guest

    Tammi Jonas – Australian Food Sovereignty Alliance & farmer | Series 4 guest 

    Michael Taylor – farmer | Series 4 guest

     

     

  • Ep 37 | Darren Doherty

    Charlie’s guest for the final episode of Series 3 is Darren Doherty. Darren  is a self confessed regenerative integrationist and the conversation he had with Charlie certainly supports that description of this multi-talented consultant, environmentalist and landscape manager. Charlie explores with Darren his career from growing up in Bendigo, Victoria, his days in hospitality and connection with producers, through to his current world renowned landscape and holistic management consulting business ‘Regrarians’, unearthing a wealth of wisdom and experience in this last episode for Season 3.

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group .

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    Episode Takeaways and Links to follow shortly.

     

     

  • Ep 36 | Part 2 | ‘Farm2Plate Exchange’ 2021 Conference Special

    This is part 2 of the short interviews Charlie recorded at the Regionality ‘Farm 2 Plate Exchange recently.

     

    He spoke with the author of ‘Call of the Reed Warbler’, Charlie Massy, one of Australia most celebrated chefs and ‘keeping it local’ advocate Christine Manfield, organic dairy farmer extraordinaire Chris Eggert, food writer, farmer, TV personality and chef Matthew Evans, and Shannon Kelly, first generational farmer and a Joel Salatin disciple. The mix of guests ensures all food and farmer tastes and inclinations are satisfied in this epic 2 hour episode.

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group .

    To join our Patreon community click here – Patreon patrons receive exclusive access to webinars and transcripts + a range other perks in the making!

    Listen now:

    Episode Links : 

    Farm2Plate Exchange 2021 organised by Regionality

    Interview 1 (00:04:00) | Charles Massy regenerative farmer & author of the ‘Call of the Reed Warbler

    Interview 2 (00:24:23) | Christine Manfield chef & writer

    Interview 3 (00:47:45) | Chris Eggert organic dairy farmer

    Interview 4 (01:10:48) | Matt Evans farmer, TV personality, chef & author

    Interview 5 (01:37:06) | Shannon Kelly regenerative farmer

     

     

     

  • Ep 36 | Part 1 | ‘Farm2Plate Exchange’ 2021 Conference Special

    In this compilation episode, Charlie interviews a number of presenters at Regionality’s 2021 ‘Farm2Plate Exchange’ Conference.

     

    Part 1 features interviews with Rose Wright, Founder & MD of Regionality; legendary indigenous foods advocate, farmer & writer Bruce Pascoe; Dr Georgina Davis, CEO of Queensland Farmers Federation; regenerative farming stalwart Stuart Larsson of Mara Seeds & Soft Agriculture; award winning dairy farmer Kay Tommerup & Part 1 closes with up and coming water warrior Kate McBride.

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group .

    To join our Patreon community click here – Patreon patrons receive exclusive access to webinars and transcripts + a range other perks in the making!

    Listen now:

    Episode Links : 

    Farm2Plate Exchange 2021 organised by Regionality

    Interview 1 (00:04:21) | Rose Wright (Regionality | Founder & Managing Director)

    Interview 2 (00:35:47) | Prof. Peter Pascoe (writer) book collection includes Dark Emu (2014)

    Interview 3 (01:01:25) | Dr. Georgina Davis (CEO) – Queensland Farmers Federation

    Interview 4 (01:20:52) | Stuart Larsson  (Managing Director – Mara Seeds)

    Interview 5 (01:41:59) | Kay Tommerup (Farmer) – Tommerup’s Dairy Farm

    Interview 6 (02:01:14) | Kate McBride (Farmer)

     

     

  • Ep 35 | Dave Westbrook

    Charlie’s guest for this episode is Dave Westbrook. Charlie caught up with Dave Westbrook at Hanaminno for this interview which tracks Dave’s journey from cropping farm boy, through to owning his own grazing farm and business, family succession challenges, development of his farm management skills through the Farm Owners Academy, and subsequent training as a farm business coach. Dave has a compelling and enlightening story to tell and does so in a very open and values based way.

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group .

    To join our Patreon community click here – Patreon patrons receive exclusive access to webinars and transcripts + a range other perks in the making!

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways: 

    There has always been a big pull towards the Australian nature and landscape for Dave | He grew up on a cropping farm on the Yorke Peninsula in South Australia | His father helped him buy a farm on Kangaroo Island (KI) where his wife Becky had grown up and he no experience with livestock | There was a honeymoon period of 2 years until Dave started to really research and set goals and started to hit his KPI’s | ‘Quirky cooking’ cooking resource  helped Dave and Becky address their daughter’s eczema skin condition with the GAPS (Gut And Psychology Syndrome) diet | The results of using food and looking at health differently was a catalyst for Dave looking at managing his farm more regeneratively – if we can heal the body can we heal land? Dave and Becky joined up as clients to the Farm Owners Academy (FOA) in 2015 and have been in the Platinum program for 3 years | Greg Johnsson of FOA had been advising Dave on Kangaroo Island prior to joining FOA | FOA is a values focused training program and Dave was able to identify his true values through the program and set a new course in life and farming with these values as the guiding principles | Life is often about finding the balance between time and money, and we spend our lives on the ladders of life, of either the ladder of purpose or ladder of ego | Dave was on the ladder of ego for many years feeling he had to prove himself to his father, himself and his community | Men potentially spend more time on the ego ladder | Dave uses the analogy of shooting an arrow to explain the catalyst for progress is often pain. There is pain in pulling back the arrow however this has to be experienced to move the arrow (life) forward | Dave is now a coach with FOA | Dave lost ownership of his farm on KI back to his father and essentially was made an employee of the business | Personal development and FOA were essential in guiding Dave through this period | He now helps farmers through his coaching with their accountability and achieving their goals. Anger is a symptom of fear | Journaling and affirmations are a big part of Dave’s life and for his clients | ‘Look good, feel good, play good’ is one of Dave’s mantras | Win your morning, elevate your life | 20:20:20 – spend the first hour of your day split into 20 minutes sections – 20 workout, 20 meditations and/or journaling and/or affirmations | 20 education, listen to a podcast, read a book | The happy hormone serotonin is released from gut when working out | Robin Sharman’s areas of life to focus on – heart set, health set, mind set and soul set | Women are more proactive in change | Farmers who go off on a spiritual journey  are the happiest they have been – their lives flow. More time, more money, their families’ are happy. Wayne Dye – “If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change” | It’s exciting to know that there are 1000’s of years of knowledge for us to learn | When I slowed down, everything sped up – a hard paradigm to break through | Always live above the line | We don’t own our kids | Children need 2 things in life – love & chores!

    Episode Links :

    Dave Westbook AKA @adventurefarmer  

    Evie and the Bushfire – Becky Westbrook (children’s book)

    Farm Owners Academy (FOA) 

    Profitable Farmer – FOA podcast 

  • Ep 34 | Peter Andrews

    Charlie’s guest for this episode is Peter Andrews. Peter Andrews is one of Australia’s landscape geniuses, who has been battling to change the stats quo attitude of government, farmers and land managers to hydrology and restoring landscape function for 40 years. Charlie sat with Peter at his farm in the central Tablelands of NSW while he recounted his formative years of desert life, how that informed his lifelong passion to restore the oldest continent in the world, and highlights that the healing of this land is totally within our reach if we reinstate a few simple principles of land management that had kept this landscape the most productive in the world.

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group .

    To join our Patreon community click here – Patreon patrons receive exclusive access to webinars and transcripts + a range other perks in the making!

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways: 

    There is a predictable natural sequence within the landscape we just have to recreate and nurture it | Peter’s property at Bungonia was bought to be a demonstration site, this region of NSW was a very over exploited area given its location between Sydney and Canberra | Plants are specialists at bringing various components and elements into a landscape | We don’t recreate the old landscape, we recreate the processes and function of the landscape | The landscape evolved due to plants managing water | Frequent fire, flood and drought are symptoms of a dysfunctional landscape | Peter grew up at Broken Hill where his experiences of desert storms and floods started him on his journey to rehydrate the landscape of Australia | Pioneering plants are essential to repair the landscapes | The current agricultural system that replies on the removal of specific plants is costing our farmers businesses and the landscapes health | Peter’s experience with sheep health in those early years identified the importance of nutrition and how a functioning landscape provides a broad range of plants to provide this nutrition | Over-stocked properties and poor understanding of hydrology has caused the degradation of the landscape | Early experiments on the family property at Broken Hill included ripping along the high water mark of food plains | The Australian landscape had a higher percentage of pines and palms than is currently there | We are generally left with fire recovery desert plants, mostly eucalypts | Water much more influential in the atmosphere than carbon | Hot air produced inland from a lack of transpiring vegetation and moving towards, and being absorbed by, the area over the moist ocean creates damaging weather events | Capillary action and gravity are the fundamental phenomena NSF relies upon to work | Fire flood and drought are opportunities to change the pattern and create plant succession | The Peter’s horses performance were results of the management of his land, where a fundamental principle was to let all plants grow | Willows are suckers in the landscape wounds that are creeks and rivers | Peter was able to double the aquatic life in riparian zones in 2 years using willows to heal them | 95mm dew can be accumulated in a year where ground cover is maintained | Restoring deciduous green trees in flow lines reduces fire risk | The eucalypts in the landscape before human management were huge, towering above the canopy and had the role of reducing the escape of moisture from the area | The best management post any fire is to spread seeds of deciduous shrub and tree species | It all gets back to human and environmental health and this is Peter’s motivation.

    Episode Links:

    Tarwyn Park Training 

    Australian Story ‘ Land Regeneration -Peter Andrews’ – 2017

    TALS Institute – Peter’s ‘The Australian Landscape Science’ Institute

    Dr. Jan Pokorny – Scientist 

     

  • Ep 33 | Stuart Andrews

    Charlie caught up with Stuart Andrews, the son of the founder of Natural Sequence Farming (NSF) Peters Andrews, the day after Stuart had completed a 4 day NSF training workshops at Charlie’s farm Hanaminno. Stuart is an incredibly open and honest man, and he left few stones unturned in taking Charlie thought the fascinating and often turbulent life as the son of Peter Andrews, the legacy Peter has left, and the continuation of his fathers life work.

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group .

    To join our Patreon community click here – Patreon patrons receive exclusive access to webinars and transcripts + a range other perks in the making!

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways: 

    Stuart believes that we can never bring our landscape back to how it was, but we can rebuild the function it once had | Stuart describes the current Australian landscape like a dis-hevelled dinosaur skeleton, that we need to piece back together to restore landscape function | Peter’s teaching style was challenging | Stuart was growing up on their farm Tarwyn Park under Peter’s management,  whilst Peter was still figuring out the principles of Natural Sequence Farming | Stuart left school at 15, and it’s not so much that he hated school but he  loved the farm more |  Tarwyn Park was a thoroughbred stud running large herds of horses, a very different management style to conventional studs | With Peter’s focus on understanding, experimenting and developing the NSF principles, and not on the horse business, meeting the financial needs of the farm was challenging when Stuart was in his late teens | The horses were his test case, using these sensitive creatures in the landscape to test his theories | The bank repossessed the farm in 1994 for 6 weeks before Peter managed to secure a Research and Development grant which secured the property again from the bank for another couple of years | The bank came knocking on the door again in 1998 and Stuart sort finance to take over the properties and the debt. Peter refused to hand over property, however he finally did release the property and the horse business to Stuart | Stuart agreed with Peter that he could continue to do NSF work on Tarwyn Park | A visit from the then deputy Prime Minister John Anderson validated on a public & national stage the work Peter had been doing | In 2010 coal miners started to take interest in the Bylong Valley area and for 3 years the Andrews family battled with the miners, then eventually chose to sell – as the threat of being surrounded by the mine was greater than any desire to stay, fight and then put up with that situation | There have been many benefits to landscape of miners ‘locking up’ the country in the Bylong Valley they bought | In 2012 Stuart ran his first NSF training program | His family now live on one of their farms on SE Queensland – Forage Farms, and produce meat chickens, eggs and pork, inspired by Joel Salatin of Polyface Farm | Stuart believes we have created a massive drainage system in our landscape, and we must break this paradigm of how to manage water effectively if we are to restore its function and our farms |

    Episode Links: 

    Tarwyn Park Training 

    Forage Farms – Stuart Andrew’s farm enterprise, Sunshine Coast, Queensland

    RCS  – Holistic Agribusiness education providers

    Australian Story ‘ Land Regeneration -Peter Andrews’ – 2017

    Low Stress Stock Handling – Grahame Rees

    Polyface Farm – Joel Salatin

  • Ep 32 | Part 2 | 2021 Farming Matters Conference Special

    This is the Part 2 of Charlie’s 2021 ‘Farming Matters’ Conference Special. Charlie continues his collection of interviews with presenters and attendees at the 2021 Land to Market ‘Farming Matters’ conference. In Part 2 Charlie speaks with Sam Johnson from Boxgum Grazing, legendary mentor and Holistic farmer David Marsh, Courtney McGregor the Sustainability Officer at Harris Farm Markets, and Harry Youngman, farmer and co-founder of Tiverton Agriculture Impact Fund.

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group .

    To join our Patreon community click here – Patreon patrons receive exclusive access to webinars and transcripts + a range other perks in the making!

    Listen now:

    Episode Links : 

    2021 ‘Farming Matters’ Conference organised by Land to Market Australia. Report by Soils to Life.

    Interview 1 (0:05:50) | Sam Johnson of Boxgum Grazing, NSW.

    Interview 2 (0:23:48) | David Marsh holistic farmer.

    Interview 3 (0:45:39) | Courtney McGregor Sustainability Officer Harris Farm Markets.

    Interview 4 (1:08:42) | Harry Youngman farmer & co-founder of Tiverton Agriculture Impact Fund.

    other links of interest : 

    Provenir – Quality meat through highest welfare on farm processing.

    https://www.rcsaustralia.com.au/RCS – Holistic Agribusiness and education services,

    Alan Savory – holistic farmer, ecologist and founder of the Savory Institute.

    Lyn Sykes – Farm Family Facilitator.

     

  • Ep 32 | Part 1 | 2021 Farming Matters Conference Special

    Charlie attended the recent ‘Farming Matters’ conference organised by the awesome crew at Land to Market, and did a series of quick interviews with some of the presenters and attendees.

    In part one Charlie speaks with Tony Hill, Executive chair of Land to Market, CEO of Maia Grazing Peter Richardson, Brian Wehlburg the prolific Holistic Management educator, and Rachel Ward, Australian actress, producer, director and passionate regenerative farmer and advocate.

     

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group .

    To join our Patreon community click here – Patreon patrons receive exclusive access to webinars and transcripts + a range other perks in the making!

    Listen now:

    Episode Links : 

    2021 ‘Farming Matters’ Conference organised by Land to Market Australia. Report by Soils to Life

    Interview 1 (00:05:21) | Tony Hill ( Exec Chair) – Land to Market Australia

    Interview 2 (00:21:21) | Peter Richardson (CEO) – Maia Grazing

    Interview 3 (00:32.15) | Brian Wehlburg (Founder) – Inside Outside Management

    Interview 4 (00:50:58) | Rachel Ward – Australian actress/film maker and passionate regenerative farming advocate.  Rachel was interviewed by Charlie for The Regenerative Journey podcast in 2020 (Ep 17)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Ep 31 | Aaron McKenzie

    Charlie’s guest for this episode is Aaron Mckenzie, the movement & lifestyle coach. Aaron Mckenzie has been on a lifelong regenerative journey, and has been committed to supporting others in their own health journeys since the age of 19. Charlie and Aaron delve deep into the catalysts for his change, his quick tips for lifelong wellness and the importance of regenerative agriculture in restoring not just the environment but human health.

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group .

    To join our Patreon community click here – Patreon patrons receive exclusive access to webinars and transcripts + a range other perks in the making!

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways : 

    Mind, body & spirit are the pinnacles of Aarons health philosophy, being one of a few ‘fitness instructors’ who focus as much on food as physicality | He left high school at 13, and spent his time skateboarding | After a period of suffering bad skin and lack of direction a Naturopath and whole food eating turned his life around, and he completed his Higher School Certificate | At age 18-19 Aaron started his current work with clients | Some quick tips to good health – get plenty of sleep, wind down every night before bed, enjoy every mouthful when eating, retain good relationships, stretch daily, keep hydrated, work and focus on your breath and breathing | Aaron ate 1 full cow and 2 lambs over 10 months including their organs | He consumed 800g/day of meat which was approx. 2-2,500 calories a day | Plants have chemical defences to stop them being eaten and the culinary arts are a way to deal with these | Everything a human needs to be healthy is in an animal | Aaron monitored his changes via blood tests and other markers | Sleep helps regulate the hormones that regulate appetite. Less sleep = more cravings and snacking | Aaron advocates daily fasting of 14-16 hrs | Learning to say no and learning to prioritise are the 2 biggest positive steps one can take to reclaiming their life.

    Episode Links:

    https://www.originofenergy.com/ – Aaron’s website 

    Origin of Energy – Aaron’s YouTube channel

    Fuelled by the Sun – You Tube short doco by Aaron when he visited Hanaminno Nov ‘19

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Ep 30 | Neil Perry

    In this episode Charlie interviews chef Neil Perry.

    Charlie was able to grab the very busy Neil Perry for a quick interview at his iconic Sydney restaurant Rockpool Bar and Grill. Neil is a cornerstone of the Australia restaurant industry, with many chefs hats under his belt, a rich history of contribution to the trade and a keen supporter of farmers and artisan producers for many years. Topics covered include his early appreciation of the seasonality of food, development of his unique culinary skills, the impact of Covid-19 on the food industry and the opportunity he sees food playing in the indigenous reconciliation process.

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group .

    To join our Patreon community click here – Patreon patrons receive exclusive access to webinars and transcripts + a range other perks in the making!

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways : 

    Neil Perry is best known for his signature Rockpool restaurants | He has been and still is a mentor to many | Whilst now he spends much of his time away from the pans he still loves getting into the kitchen, the smell of open cooking fires and the energy of the kitchen | Neil’s Father was a butcher and Neil lived on George’s river Near Sydney, NSW where fresh seafood is in abundance | Neil grew up with fresh eggs, chickens, veggies, and was immersed in seasonality and freshness from a young age |’Great chefs of France’ cookbook was Neil’s first inspiration, including chef Michel Gerard | Neil was the chef at Barrenjoey House at Pittwater, Sydney at the end of 1982 and one of the first chefs to reference the producers on his menu | The best dish starts with best ingredients | His genius is getting best out of people | Reconciliation has gone off the rails in recent years and Covid-19 has over run the climate movement | Australia has a wonderfully diverse culture, and this is represented in its food culture | Rockpool Foundation is Neil’s charity that raised the money to fund Hope Delivery which  | Finding staff is the only matter Neil is concerned about right now when opening a new restaurant due to lack of international students, and work visa holders as a consequence of Covid-19 and the restrictions on travel | There is a movement away from importing overseas produce as Australia is growing more of these once hard to find products | Neil uses vegetable or peanut oil when cooking Asian food otherwise he uses olive oil | Copper pots are beautiful to cook with! | His Qantas involvement is increasing as flight restrictions ease and more ‘bubble flying’ will take place | Neil’s new cookbook is due for release in October 2021| Neil reckons Aust. Domestic flights food is some of the best in the world! | If Neil could put a sign on a major highway it would say ‘We are one’ | Neil is a firm believer in the mantra of ‘Community comes first’.

    Episode Links:

    Neil Perry – Chef

    Rockpool Bar & Grill – Neil’s restaurant

    Margaret – Neil’s new restaurant opening soon in Double Bay, Sydney

    Neil’s Qantas collaboration – Forbes Interview (2018)

    ‘Great Chefs of France’ – Book by Anthony Blake

    John Susman – An Early Collaborator of Neil’s  

    Hope Delivery – Part of the Rockpool Foundation. Feeding 5000 people weekly. Served 300,000 meals in 9 months in 2020

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Ep 29 | Mitch & Nina Bray

    In this episode Charlie interviews regen farming’s powerhouse couple Mitch & Nina Bray. Charlie caught up with Mitch and Nina at their Noosa Hinterland farm midway through an Introduction to Biodynamics workshop that they were hosting. It was a lively conversation and is in fact the ‘first’ couple Charlie has interviewed for the podcast. Prior to meeting Mitch and Nina had led interesting and quite different lives. On meeting their pathways transected & their regenerative journey together began. Through environmental and health challenges they have been transitioning from conventional to regenerative cattle, crop and vegetable farming with great success.

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group .

    To join our Patreon community click here – Patreon patrons receive exclusive access to webinars and transcripts + a range other perks in the making!

    Listen now:

     

    Episode Takeaways : 

    Bought property in Noosa hinterland in response to a changing climate and seasonal pattern at their property at Ellangowan near Toowoomba in SE Qld, presents the opportunity to grow more food with the greater rainfall, and also presents challenges | Have a licence to grow hemp | Great rapport with a very like minded community on the coast, found their tribe | Together since 2010, Nina is a trained nurse and grew up on a farm, Mitch diesel fitter, who’s family is originally from Condobolin | Started on his small block with Nina | Underlining urge to farm even though both had chosen careers away from farming | Started with an independent agronomist and in the conventional farming space – with sheep, then cattle however due to flooding and trashing of fences decided to focus on cropping | The birth of their first child was the catalyst for change as Nina realised that her choices had far reaching impacts on her family and this was also true for their farming choices | Gained Organic certification for their home farm in 2014-15 which was essentially a trial block using more natural practices | Transitioned half their farm first | First organic crop was wheat | Organic corn out yielding conventional corn | An organic farm can still yield in dry years when conventional might struggle to produce, and in the dry years prices are better | Input costs are lower than conventional | Liquid injection great technique to add inputs | They won the Allan Brimblecombe Shield for the Highest Yielding Variety in a Cotton Seed Distributors (CSD) Variety Dryland Trial 2017 – 2018 | 11.7 bales/ha using their more natural biological inputs like fish and kelp emulsions and compost teas | ‘Less inputs more often’ is a principle that has worked well for them | They are growing on corn, soy sorghum, wheat barley millet, vetch, mung beans on their organic farm | The have tried ‘Relay Cropping’-eg sowing a legume into an already established wheat crop | Tip for farmers wanting to transition to more natural farming practices-stop expecting a clean paddock, managing a mixed of plants has benefits for nutrition and beneficial insects | They use Integrated Pest Management (IPM) techniques to manage insect pests | Livestock are great at targeting unwanted plants in a cropping rotation system | Nina uses homeopathics on the cattle, trough dose-NZ business called Simillimum Health and Homeopathy | They use Buffalo fly traps and a ‘Bos Bag’ w diatomaceous earth | Cattle often get a shower in the yards of saline water, and they also use sulfur to help manage buffalo fly and ticks | Dung beetles came back when they removed much of the synthetic chemicals out of their system | Their Noosa Hinterland farm is 400ac and in conversion to organic now | They both attended our Introduction to Biodynamics workshop in 2018 where their love and use of Biodynamics on their farms started | In 2018 Mitch was very sick, having suffered an occlusion (similar to a stroke), and his speech and movement was impacted – he was in bed for 3 months, and too no medications – Mitch did everything naturally | Biodynamics makes your farms vibrant. Its energetic, palpable and you can almost feel the life force that comes from using Biodynamics | Biodynamics is a way of life. You can’t un-see it once you have seen it. Mitch and Nina think that whatever they grow someone will be healthier from it | Biodynamics is about growing together and working together | They don’t believe you have to be a purist to incorporate Biodynamics into your farming practice.

    Episode Links: 

    Bray Farms – Mitch & Nina Bray website 

    FB – Bray Farms 

    IG – Bray Farms / IG –  The Beach Farm, Noosa 

    Introduction to Biodynamics Workshops | Charlie Arnott & Hamish Mackay

    Biodynamics – Short read | Charlie Arnott 

    Integrated Pest Management (IPM) 

    Simillimum Health and Homeopathy – NZ animal health company

    Bos bag – Fly control measure 

    John Feahan  – Australian dung beetle expert 

    Kandanga Farm Store –  Mary Valley, Sunshine Coast QLD

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Ep 28 | Kate Nelson

    In this episode Charlie interviews Kate Nelson. Kate Nelson is a passionate and outspoken advocate of educating people to the ills and insidious nature of plastics in our environment and our bodies. Charlie and Kate touch on her journey into the world of activism and the many ways that plastics impact our lives. Her book ‘I Quit Plastics’ is a wonderful guide to navigating a world where plastics are everywhere but avoidable if one changes one’s perspective and behaviours around plastic.

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group .

    To join our Patreon community click here – Patreon patrons receive exclusive access to webinars and transcripts + a range other perks in the making!

    Listen now:

     

    Episode Takeaways: 

    Currently living on 5 ac in an 1890s house | Climate awakening 2 years ago in an agricultural context | Grew up in Minnesota with much involvement in the lakes and water as a canoe camp leader | Environmental focus at college on philosophy and ethics | She volunteered for Jean – Michael Cousteau’s NFP and met oceanographer Dr. Andrea O’ Neill of USGS | Learning of the ingestion of micro plastics by marine life was shocking to Kate and set her on a path of advocacy | Initially very outspoken and was urgent to change the world! | Aggression and forcing people doesn’t work | Contributed to the ‘Save the Mermaids’ campaign banning plastic shopping bags in California and helped influence government policy in California | Was the marketing director Tiki activewear in LA whom recycle plastic into activewear | Recycling is a many headed beast with greenwashing prevalent | Plastic is insidious and can be found everywhere, as ingredients in many products and as the packaging of many products | Plastic flakes and degrades into micro plastics, and it leaches into food and liquids it is packaged in | Plastic is also released with use – into the air, onto your food. It’s in clothing, in tyres…  | The average person eats a credit card worth of plastic a week | Plastic is very functional product hence why it’s everywhere | Plastic bonds are loose so the chemicals it is made up of are released into the environment | Temperature and age of plastics will determine how quickly it breaks down | Off gassing is the airborne release of a chemical, a chemical in vapor form which happens with new plastic | Plastic is attracted to fat – lipophilic, which can accelerate how quickly it leaches | Some plastics are estrogenic, the pseudo-estrogens in plastic tell our bodies we’re pregnant and this growth response is linked to obesity and autism | Other medical and epigenetic impacts are cancer and heart disease, man boobs, and genital changes | The recycling industry didn’t develop at the same rate as the Plastics industry which has created the huge plastics in the environment problem | The disposable nature of current plastics is reflective of our ever increasing need for external gratification… and products are poorly made | Kate’s mentors include -Dr. Andrea O’Neill, Captain Charles Moore discovered the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, Sea Bin CEO Pete Ceglinski, Senator Pete Whish-Wilson, Maria Westerbos founder of Plastic Soup Foundation and Helena Norberg-Hodge founder and director of Local Futures | Plastic ash is 30x more toxic than actual plastic | Kate hosts many retreats for plastic free supporters.

    Episode Links: 

    www.iquitplastics.com Kate’s website

    Mercast podcast Kate’s podcast 

    I Quit Plastics Kate Nelson’s book

    https://www.boomerangalliance.org.au/

    https://algalita.org/

    https://plasticfreebyron.com/

    Ocean Futures Foundation – Jean – Michael Costeau’s NFP

    Dr. Andrea O’ Neill – Oceanographer w/ USGS

    The Plastic Soup Foundation – The Plastic Soup Foundation studies plastics and its impact on the environment founded by Maria Westerbos

    Estrogeneration – book by Anthony Jay

    Captain Charles Moore – Oceanographer and boat captain 

    Pete Ceglinski – Sea Bin CEO  

    Senator Pete Whish-Wilson – the ‘surfing senator’

    Helena Norberg-Hodge, founder and director of Local Futures and director of 2011 doco.  ‘The Economics of Happiness’

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Ep 27 | Grant Hilliard

    In this episode Charlie interviews Grant Hilliard. Grant has been at the forefront of the paddock to plate scene in Sydney for many years, proving a vital link between curious and passionate ‘eaters’ in the city with the farmers who are producing regeneratively and ethically grown meat. Charlie and Grant traverse the line between government regulation, consumer sentiment and farming behaviours in exploring the current food system, its short comings and opportunities.

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group .

    To join our Patreon community click here – Patreon patrons receive exclusive access to webinars and transcripts + a range other perks in the making!

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways: 

    Grant operates a wholesale and retail butcher shop in Marrickville, Sydney, selling meat  and cuts of meat not usually seen in butcher shops eg. 3-4 year old beef, sourcing direct from producers | Buying direct from farmers is Feather and Bones point of difference | Grant grew up in suburban Melbourne with little time on farms | At Primary school he did a farm trip for a week to a dairy, and witnessed the slaughter of a sheep for food, which had profound formative effect on him | He was a vegetarian for a couple years whilst living in a remote nature reserve | Grant studied communications in Sydney and was involved in the making of a number of films | Whilst studying he worked as a waiter to pay the bills,  the famous Tony Bilson was one of his first bosses | He was the sommelier at Sean’s Panaroma in Bondi when he visited vineyards that got him interested in the location of food production | Information on the source of food was very scarce back then. He went looking for lamb, and found the rare Southdown breed near Oberon in the Central tablelands of NSW | He sold 3 different lambs to 3 different chefs, which was the beginning of his journey into sourcing good food direct from producers | The wool industry in Australia has pulled the meat sheep industry out of shape, with the wool breed Merino being used to produce most of the lamb available as a cross bred lamb | Grant visits every farm to understand them and provide that special link between farmers, not just between farmers and consumers | Whilst focused on rare breeds initially, Grant also now appreciates genetic diversity and the interconnection of things | Phenotype of an animal ( the influence of its environment such as food available) is just as important as it’s genotype |  Feeding of animals in a restricted environment (such as in feedlots) restricts their ability to source a full profile of nutrients | A diverse diet produced in a diverse landscape produces a diverse nutrient profile in the product | Angus cattle as a breed are highly genetically meddled with | Grant only sells one Angus producer’s beef and it originates from an old closed herd from the US with original Aberdeen Angus type genetics | The breed has been genetically commoditized | The current beef available is a reflection on the convenience for processors with little regard for consumer access to quality produce | One needs less of the meat that Grant sources and it goes further with more variety of cuts and a shorter supply chain creating a more diverse and resilient business model | 3 main challenges the food system in Australia faces incl. incorporating indigenous wisdom into food production, recognizing and accounting for the true cost of food & creating  government policy that recognizes we can’t keep farming on a declining fertility plain | Political departmental disparity is challenging the effectiveness of food policy | A super department of health, land, environment & water would help address this! | Grant suggests if farmers are thinking about supplying good meat direct to wholesalers they need to consider their distance from processors and the overall logistics, and the quality of the water supplied to their livestock | Grant’s message of hope is that land can be rehabilitated and there is plenty if evidence of that happening at a rate faster than anticipated under the appropriate regenerative management.

    Episode Links : 

    Grant Hilliard –  Sydney Morning Herald article 

    Feather and Bone – 8/10-14 Lilian Fowler Place, Marrickville, Sydney, NSW 2204

    The Ethical Omnivore – Grant Hilliard’s book 

    From the Feather & Bone website ‘The Ethical Omnivore is a user-friendly recipe and handbook that will open your eyes to a better way to buy, cook and eat.  this book to answer the questions we’re asked every day in our butchery and it’s an unapologetic paean of praise for regenerative agriculture and the importance of community.  We live in an affluent era marked by an increasingly fraught relationship to food, and meat is arguably the most controversial ingredient. There is a communal ache for authenticity, for a way forward with good conscience.

    Our book explores the solution: living with a conscience; asking the right questions of whomever sells you meat or of the labels you read; and learning how to respect the animal so much that you’re willing to cook something other than chicken breast. We hope that it shows all of us how to live with less impact on the animals and environment that support us.

    Seans Panorama  – Restaurateur Sean Moran

    Phion water device – NSW, Aus

     

     

     

     

     

  • Ep 26 | Cyndi O’Meara

    My guest for Episode 26 of the Regenerative Journey is Cyndi O’Meara. Cyndi has been an advocate for healthy food production and consumption for many years. Her training was inspired by the need to understand why humans have survived for millennia and now are in the middle of a global health crisis. Cyndi is outcomes driven and an advocate for food production and processing transparency. She is particularly critical of the use of Glyphosate in farming and its insidious infiltration throughout our environment and our bodies causing much of the current ill health and chronic disease seen in our populations today. Her Nutrition Academy offers people protocols and practices to renew and manage their health and wellbeing…

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group .

    To join our Patreon community click here – Patreon patrons receive exclusive access to webinars and transcripts + a range other perks in the making!

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways: 

    Cyndi had wanted a farm since a teenager, and to marry a farmer and have 12 children! | Her intention for buying her current farm was to help people get well using the farm as a retreat | She then decided that she didn’t want to put the capital into the farm to create this kind of business, and instead changed the vision to the grazing cattle, using permaculture and syntropic farming practices | Her grandfather was an organic corn farmer in the US in the 1950s and her mum was the oldest of 11, and a member of the largest haemophilic family in world | Cyndi’s other grandfather was a NZ organic farmer | Cyndi attended University of Colorado and studied about food and culture, to help answer the anthropological question of how did man survive? | She studied to be dietitian in Australia but this study didn’t align with the anthropology she had studied | Cyndi started writing for a local paper where she was able to express her thoughts, until her articles began to conflict with conventional thinking and commercial interests – these articles later became her book | She offers programs and protocols for food and health in her Nutrition Academy program |She calls out fake foods, GMO ‘food’ and advocates for food system transparency | Synthetic biology and genetic modification is used to produce a myriad of food and fibre products, with horrendous consequences when eaten, worn or when they ‘escape’ in to Nature | Food irradiation to sanitize food is a problem, killing biome and nutrient value, and is being used more often in Australia to ‘make food more safe’! | Health problem stem from problems in the paddock where food is grown, especially where glyphosate is used | The driver of human ill health is Big Ag, not the need to regenerate human health | Imprinting of diet when baby is in utero and the children will seek out that same food (and drugs) once born | Cyndi’s father was a pharmacist then chiropractor which meant he understood mechanism then moved to an understanding of vitalism | Dr Don Huber is a Glyphosate expert Cyndi has worked with. Glyphosate stops the critical shikimate pathway which is essential for amino acid metabolism and kills good microbes in soil and in our guts. It kills the good microbes that are needed to make essential amino acids | Chronic disease now everywhere can be attributed to the use of Glyphosate and other agriculture sprays such as arsenic, lead and DDT | In the1960s 4% of people had a chronic disease, now 38-40% of children have a chronic disease, for 65 years + and above the figure is 80% | Not just food important, lifestyle, mental state, exercise, following passion etc | Cyndi home schooled her children  | Currently incensed by the governments poor understanding human health  | If Cyndi was in government she would slowly remove all fake foods | Her genius is deciphering info and put it thru a vitality and a cultural history perspective  | Cyndi is outcomes focused, the outcome of creating well being in her client | Conversations of change often happen around the kitchen table sighting  an example of her friend who moved to an outback station and changed the food and cooking ethos of the men there with outstanding results | One of her inspirations is Dr Natasha Campbell Mcbride |  Better to put effort now in the kitchen than put the time into the docs waiting room later |

    Episode Links:

    Changing Habits – Cyndi O’Meara’s website

    Lab to Table – book |  New version of Cyndi’s original book Changing Habits 

    Nutrition Academy – Cyndi’s online nutrition course

    Land to Market – Australian Holistic Management project

    Breathe – book by James Nestor

    Dr. Don Huber Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology at Purdue University

    What the Bleep do we Know !’ – documentary 

    Manifesting Matisse’ – book by Michelle Nielsen

    The Hidden Messages in Water –   book  by Masaru Emoto

    Joe Dispenza – chiro and author  

    Bridging Science & Spirit – book by Bruce Lipton

    Biology of belief – book by Bruce Lipton

    Dr Natasha Campbell Mcbride 

    The Fat Emperor Podcast –  Ivor Cummins 

    The Highwire Podcast – Del Bigtree 

    Evolve w/ Pete Evans Podcast – Pete Evans

    London Real Podcast – Robert F Kennedy Jnr 

    Up for a Chat podcast – Changing Habits

    100 Not Out Podcast – Marcus Pearce & Damian Kristof

    Gemtree Wines – McLaren Vale, SA

     

     

     

  • Ep 25 | David Pocock

    Charlie’s guest for Episode 25 is David Pocock. David has been named one of the best rugby players of all time, however his skills and interests go far beyond the international Rugby stage. Growing up on a Zimbabwean farm David’s interest in human and Natural ecology has been nurtured from a young age. When his family fled Zimbabwe in 2008 he brought that love of the landscape to Australia with him. David has since juggled his rugby career and advocacy for the protection of environments and rural community development, both here in Australia and back home in Zimbabwe.

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group .

    To join our Patreon community click here – Patreon patrons receive exclusive access to webinars and transcripts + a range other perks in the making!

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways: 

    Dave grew up on a flower, vegetable and beef farm in middle of Zimbabwe | Alan Savory the well known and controversial farmer and politician was an inspiration, as was Johann Zietsman who both challenged the traditional mindset | Dave was always interested in nature and human ecology and wanted to be a park ranger | Both Dave’s parents are from farming families | Zimbabwean reform program in 1999-2000 was badly executed which led his family to be kicked off their farm and their emigration to Australia | Dave spent 3 years in high school in Brisbane and threw himself into sport in 2008-9 | In Zimbabwe, some of the projects that Dave has participated in, target food and water security issues, through organisations such as ‘Farming Gods Way’ | Dave advocates connecting with the Australian landscape by spending time outside and  in nature developing one’s  Ecological and landscape literacy | The somewhat necessary control of invasive species such as horses is controversial | Dave is completing a Masters of Sustainable Agriculture at Charles Sturt University | His father has been a significant mentor, as was his mothers father | Reading has played a big part in David’s connecting to Australia | Alan Savory was an outspoken politician against the Rhodesian gov ref. apartheid, and it seemed that it was his ( Alan’s ) moving away from Africa that allowed him to amplify his wisdom and Holistic Management (HM) education to a wider global audience | Dave doesn’t feel fully accepted as a Zimbabwean now | Technology has brought us benefits but it has also brought us closer to the cliff edge | South Zimbabwean Project aims to support ag and community development to create thriving people and ecosystems as part of UNDP.

    Episode Links:

    David Pocock – Official website and Linktr.ee links

    IG – David Pocock

    In Our Nature – Book by David & Emma Pocock 

    Alan Savory Zimbabwean ecologist, livestock farmer, and president and co-founder of the Savory Institute

    Savory Institute – The Savory Institute equips land managers with innovative tools and curricula and conducts research on the ecological, social, and financial outcomes associated with Holistic Management

    Johann Zietsman – South African cattle farmer & practical scientist

    Zimbabwes Land Reform 

    Farming God’s Way A resource given to the wider body of Christ, to equip the poor and break the yoke of poverty first pioneered in Zimbabwe in 1984.

    MA Sustainable Agriculture – Charles Sturt University

    Call of the Reed Warbler – Book by Charles Massy

    Dark Emu – Book by Bruce Pascoe

    A Sand County Almanac – Book by Aldo Leopold

    Holistic Management – Definition 

    Moorlands Lamb – Biodynamic lamb producer Vince Heffernan , Yass NSW 

    Climate Change Adaptation Program (Zim) – UNDP

     

     

     

  • Ep 24 | Charlie Arnott

    In the first Episode of Series 3 our podcast host Charlie Arnott picks up the mic and shares his thoughts and insights into the world of regenerative agriculture currently and identifies some key trends and areas of growth to watch in 2021. The episode also includes a preview of what’s in store in the upcoming series. If the growing interest in the regen movement is anything to go by, then you would be strongly advised to fasten those seat belts and get ready for a powerful & life altering Series 3!

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group .

    To join our Patreon community click here – Patreon patrons receive exclusive access to webinars and transcripts + a range other perks in the making!

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways: 

    Charlie talks about activity on his farm ‘Hanaminno’ and compares January 2021 with that of 2020 | The growing consumer interest  in the origins of the food they are eating | Simple concept – the impact of and the outcome of people being more curious about their food has a global significance | The role parents play in setting a good example – children are appreciating this and getting onto the band wagon, setting wonderful examples for life | Men are good at looking for solutions, it’s women who are good at getting the stuff done | Organic or non chemically produced food should be the normal and the chemically produced should be labelled ‘chemical’, turn it around | Re: the financial sectors growing interest in regen ‘Formulating a value based on not the infrastructure. What hasn’t been looked at until now is what’s under the ground. What you can’t see is some of the most important real estate we have | More consideration should be given to how and who should be farming the land.

    Episode Links:

    www.charliearnott.com.au

    Patreon page for the Regenerative Journey podcast 

    RCS – Grazing for Profit Course

    Growing Nutritious Food in your Backyard w/ Biodynamics Urban Taster session w/ Hamish Mackay & Charlie Arnott – March 2021

    It’s in the Soil – Harris Farm Markets regen campaign Feb 2021

    Odonata – Nigel Sharp / Sam Marwood

    Cultivate Farms – Sam Marwood

    Venture Organic – Adam Gibson

    The Big Little Farm – film and film director John Chester

     

     

  • Ep 23 | Pt 2 | Tommy Herschell

    In Part 2 of Charlie’s interview with Tommy Herschell, Tommy dives further into the workshops he facilitates, runs through his ‘Form guide for a fella’, and pulls apart the myth of the ‘male code’ or ‘mens lore’ using his own experiences and insights.

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group.  

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways:

    Tommy facilitates both men’s and boys workshops where he encourages them to tell their story and/or listen | The number 1 skill to learn from these workshops is that it’s ok not to be going good…’ | Form guide for a fella 1. Drop anchor – Stop for 60 secs, 2. Take stock-assess the situation, 3. Get out of the queue – step away from old paradigms and actions, 4. Road test -what’s another way to handle the situation, 5. Kill the pig – challenge yourself, 6. Eat the frog – delay gratification, 7. Chew the fat but don’t spin the yarn | People from the land are honest | Neil Pringle legend rugby league player mentor of Tommy’s | Find a mate you can talk to | Read a hard book

    Episode Links: 

    Tommy Herschell  – you can contact Tommy via his website / email & tel. # are at footer of page.

    Find ya feet – You Tube / Mahindra collaboration

    Raise – Tommy is an ambassador

    Tomorrow Man – reinventing masculinity

     

  • Ep 23 | Pt 1 | Tommy Herschell

    In this episode Charlie interviews teacher and mentor Tommy Herschell.

    Tommy Herschell is well placed to facilitate workshops that break down the myth that men and boys can’t talk about their feelings and problems, given his own experiences as a boy and young man. In this interview he courageously dives deep into his past, from a reliance on alcohol to help douse the pain of various childhood experiences, to now facilitating workshops to help males rewrite their stories of what it is to be a man, and societies expectation of them.

    Listen now:

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group.

    =

    Episode Takeaways:

    Tommy and Charlie met a few years ago in Melbourne at a conference and Tommy’s first trip to Hanaminno was to bring Charlie a couple of bee hives | Pittwater in Sydneys Northern Beaches is where Tommy calls home | He grew up in Tugan, QLD, and had typical boyhood fun in the suburbs and surfing | When he was 10 years old things changed for Tommy when his parents separated – his reaction and way to deal with this was to get into trouble at school and telling tall stories etc | He had anxiety about everything and drinking became a crutch in his late teens | His woodwork teacher inspired him to be a school teacher | He traveled the world with a surf magazine where he met his wife Clare | Tommy doused his problems with alcohol like farmers douse their problem (weeds, pests etc) with chemical poisons | Best mate Bing called him on his behaviour | Tommy says Clare has no filter and see’s the best in people! | She calls him out, and had the courage to help him break his destructive cycle of behaviour | A victim mentality played a big part in his life | MATE – stands for Meet At The End, and is derived from the World War 1 | He realised he needed to do the work he’s doing now, it’s a way to give back and is a kind of therapy for himself | Find Ya Feet was born via the relationship he developed with Bastien Madrill who was dying of an aggressive cancer, Ewings sarcoma. Bastien taught Tommy many things about life and his appreciation of it | Tommy now works in many bush community’s, including Dubbo, Trangie and Narromine, and with Matt Hayden in QLD | The workshops Tommy facilitates explore the concept of ‘men’s law’, and breaks down the myth that men and boys aren’t meant to talk about their feelings and problems they are facing | In 2 hours Tommy Herschell adds a truckload of tools to a blokes belt for when they need that helping hand to start the conversation that ultimately saves lives. He does that by championing vulnerability, role modelling speaking up, and showing a real man puts up his hand for help. This workshop transforms the bloke who thinks it’s weak to speak into the champion who knows we go from zero to hero simply by tellin’ and owning our story!

    ‘We’re allowed to make mistakes…It’s how we come back from those mistakes that makes a man a man‘.

    Episode Links: 

    Tommy Herschell – Tommy’s website

    Bastien Madrill story

    Farmers Friend workshops – Tommy & Charlie working together

    Matthew Hayden & Find Ya Feet – YouTube

  • Ep 22 | Chris Eggert

    In this episode Charlie chats with his uni-friend dairy farmer Chris Eggert

     

    Charlie attended university with 4th generation dairy farmer Chris Eggert and whilst they hadn’t seen each other often since picked up right where they left off with a both lighthearted and deep dive into Chris’s life and regenerative journey from growing up a conventional dairy farm to being regarded as one of the best dairy farmers in Australia. His ability to adapt general regenerative practices and philosophies, and his logical, courageous, mindful, can do approach to farming has continued the legacy of a family farm any farmer would be proud of.

    Listen now:

     

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group.  

    Episode Takeaways : 

    Chris Eggert is a 4th generation from Wauchope, on the mid north coast of NSW | Eggert Farm (Oxhill Organics) has been certified organic for 20 years, converted in 2000 due to deregulation of the dairy industry | At that time the farm had just been bought from previous generation | Very conventionally run prior to going organic | His mother has built yoga studio on farm and is a very steadying influence on the men on the farm! | The family eats mostly from farm and nearby produce, and focus on creating a community through food and health | Work was once a chore for Chris and now is relaxing due to his change in attitude |It was once all about production, highly NPK fertilizer dependent, with animal health regimes of hormones and antibiotics |
    Chris suspects the cause of most animal sickness was from the use of urea on pasture | He was going into battle with his cows every time at milking, now it’s a joy and type of meditation |Easy calving now,  with no vet bills now- in 1999 before transitioning their vet bill was $20k |Improvement in soil takes time, improvement in animal health happens very quickly ‘once you take out the bad stuff’ | Farm biodiversity was not relevant back then | When Chris was young he wasn’t sure what wanted to do for a career |He attended University of New England (UNE) to do a Natural Resource Management degree, and deep down wanted to come back to the family farm | Chris did a Diploma in teaching in the 2000’s and taught casually at local high school to support income while transitioning |Uni taught Chris to work and learn | Deregulation of the dairy industry pushed Chris to change away from his conventional practices and there was a pull towards organic food through a growing demand for products |He went cold turkey and cut out all synthetic chemicals and fertilisers over night | Balanced soil creates healthy cows and the best milk |Chris attended a Holistic Management course run by legend HM educator Bruce Ward | Chris attended many conferences, read many books including Joel Salatin- You can Farm  followed the work of Elaine Ingham, Gary Zimmerman and Jerry Brunetti and did lots of experimentation | Chris emphasises the importance of capturing nutrients (ie. manure and urine) in the system, and says he ‘farms vertically not horizontally’, focusing on the health of the soil | The head space of farmers and wellness is not generally of interest to banks and government |Customer understanding of the importance of clean nutritious food is increasing |A farm is a great place for kids to grow up | Chris’s protein and fat measurements are both 20-30% more now then when farming conventionally | He has a number of enterprises- lambs, chickens and pigs -diversity is important not just to the health of the farm but to the mental health of the human inhabitants |‘Be you not someone else’. |Chris used wood chip mulch to create fungal highways to spread biology throughout his farm via the cows feet

    Episode Links :

    Oxhill Organics 

    HM educator Bruce Ward 

    Joel Salatin- You can Farm

    Elaine Ingham – Soil Food Web

    Biological Farmer –  Gary Zimmer  

    Jerry Brunetti – You Tube 

    Mara seeds

  • Ep 21 | Hamish Mackay

    In this episode Charlie chats with his friend and education partner Hamish Mackay

     

    Charlie has interviewed Hamish Mackay many times for his Youtube channel and this interview is a poignant reminder that whilst the principles of regenerative agriculture, and specifically Biodynamics, remain the same, its application and adaption to landscapes and communities is ever changing and definitely on the rise. Hamish takes listeners for a ride into the world of Biodynamics, leaving us with very practical and compelling steps we can take to produce better food and improve the health of our planet

    Listen now:

     

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group.  

    Episode Takeaways :

    Hamish grew up near Braidwood, NSW on a family sheep and cattle farm | Andrew his brother is his major mentor | Travelled Australia before going home to the farm and Alex Poloinsky visited the farm in 1972. Alex showed him his farm through different eyes | Alex made Hamish aware of his farm in a physical sense, made him aware of soil health | Hamish was also involved in the wool industry and worked at the famous Demeter Bakery in Glebe, Sydney | Change in the agriculture world is slowly happening and now building momentum | The practice of Biodynamics is very easy and is a form of environmental and food security when inevitably we meet challenges in the food production and environment health space | It will be important to have people in the world who are practicing Biodynamics to ensure food security as conventional practices continue to fail | 1960s was the start of change in the dairy industry in Australia | Currently there are many people in agriculture as a result of obligation to their family, rather than because it’s their destiny and are passionate about it | Spiritual science uses scientific methodology to investigate ‘things we can’t see’ | People are becoming more aware of value in organic produce both economically and nutritionally | We need to collaborate, not be competitive, in the regenerative agriculture world | Consumers are ultimately in the position to ‘judge’ the success or otherwise of regenerative farming practices | Regenerative farming is not prescriptive agriculture. That is one if its defining characteristic that sets it apart from industrial farming | The diaries of early white explorers identified that indigenous peoples managed the landscape as a ‘parkland’ like landscape | Bill Gammage in ‘The Biggest Estate on Earth’, Bruce Pascoe in ‘Dark Emu’ and Joseph Jenkins in ‘The Diary of a Welsh Swagman’ highlighted this phenomena | Our landscape is now a bit like teenagers going through puberty – its chaotic, and the recent Summer bushfires were a reflection of this | The Australian landscape was once managed, prior to white settlement. Now it’s being pillaged. It is ‘managing’ us. Again, the ferocity and complete disruption and destruction of bushfires reflects this | Biodynamic food and pasture is more mineral dense and therefore harder to digest and makes organs work harder (which keeps them healthier) In addition, one needs to eat less of it (and it is also harder to burn which makes it potentially more fire resistant) | Healthy humic aerated soil retains moisture and biology even in a drought | All mental illness has a physiological basis | Current industrial medical system treats symptom, not the cause | Nutritionally dense food impacts positively the social fabric of individuals, families and communities

    Episode Links : 

    Hamish Mackay – Farming Secrets profile

    Hamish Mackay & Charlie Arnott | Biodynamics Workshops  – 2021 workshop dates will be announced soon. Check back to www.charliearnott.com.au for dates.

    Martin Royds – farmer and regenerative farming advocate

    Mulloon institute a research, education and advocacy not-for-profit organisation

    Blackthorn Trust  – is a supportive therapeutic environment in which people can recover, grow and develop.

    Low Tox Life  – Alexx Stuart

  • Ep 20 | Matt Moran

    In this episode Charlie chats with his good friend Matt Moran.

     

     

    Charlie sat with Matt Moran in his restaurant ‘Chiswick’ in Sydney overlooking his kitchen garden from which herbs and vegetables are harvested to supplement the dishes prepared in the kitchen. It’s a great example of Matt’s dedication to seasonality, accountability and authenticity in cooking, and highlights his connection to the source of his produce and the farmers which produce it. And being a farmer himself he has kept his feet firmly on the ground despite his successes and critical acclaim.

    Listen now:

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group.  

    Episode Takeaways :

    Chiswick, the restaurant Charlie interviewed Matt in, has a rich history, is one of the oldest restaurants in Sydney and was originally a soup kitchen for navy personnel | The Kitchen garden at Chiswick makes its chefs accountable for what’s in season and on the menu | Covid has bought out the best and the worst in people | Matt grew up near Tamworth in the mid 70s then moved to western suburbs of Sydney and still had connections to farming through his family’s farm at Taralga | Matt’s interest in food started in the home economics class at high school because there were 18 girls and only 2 boys in the class! | Started his career in the kitchen at Parramatta RSL | Searched for work in kitchens during early year 11 | First apprenticeship at La Belle Helene French fine dining in Roseville with Chef Michael de Laurence | He loved his work and was besotted with food | La belle Helene cooking technique and refinement | Matt’s appreciation of quality was developed at Matt’s second job, at The Restaurant Manfredi – he learnt about the importance of quality produce | His first restaurant was The Paddington Inn 1991 and first chefs hat at age 23 in the same year | One of his secrets to success was to surrounded himself with people smarter than him | He opened ‘Moran’s’ in 1995 & various others before opening his signature restaurant Aria | Turning point was decision to expand to give others (his staff and associates) the opportunity to develop their skills and opportunities | Bruce Solomon is his business partner. It was important to bring different skills to the table. And brings a customers (Non chef) perspective | High stress industry that has a history of suicide | Legacy of working long hours and lack of support. Culture of perfectionism and ‘don’t share your troubles’ | More openness and support now | Rates of suicide and history is similar to farming world | Planning to build farm stay accommodation at his farm near Thurstan similar to Kimo Estate farm stay near Gundagai | Olive oil is best for flavouring not cooking, grape seed best for cooking! | Definitely rest steaks before serving! | Advice for chefs. Don’t do it for the fame and glory. Do it because you’re passionate about it. Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life | Matt is a Thankful4farmers ambassador – it’s a charity raising funds through product partnerships to then grant funds to regenerative farmers and associated businesses to promote the uptake of technology, regenerative practices, and enhance community and farming family well being | Matt is a judge of the delicious produce awards | Australia has the best produce in world. Chefs and customers are spoilt for choice and variety of seed stock, such as the variety of heirloom seeds at Diggers gardening club | Whilst the industry is very competitive, chefs are very respectful, supportive and friendly to each other | If Matt could put a billboard near a highway for all to see, he would have the message ‘Be Kind’ on it…

    Episode Links  :

    Matt Moran

    Kitchen Tales – Matt’s new YouTube series, Nov 2020

    Chiswick Restaurant – Sydney

    Manfredi Restaurant – Sydney

    Genevieve Copland – Hospitality Trainer and Assessor

    Aria Restaurant – Sydney

    Kimo Estate –  Farm Stay and venue, Gundagai, NSW

    Thankful4Farmers – Matt is an ambassador

    Delicious Produce Awards

    Lord Dudley Hotel – Sydney

    Straight from the Source – an online platform where you can search, explore and connect with the source of your produce.

  • Ep 19 | Pt 2 Mick Wettenhall

    This is the second part of Charlie’s chat with Mick Wettenhall.

     

     

    Charlie caught up with Mick Wettenhall at his property ‘Weemabah’ at Trangie, NSW to dig into his own regenerative journey. Mick most recently has been progressing research into a little know fungi that has an enormous capacity to sequester carbon in the soil. Mick would rather see an agricultural evolution than an agricultural revolution, highlighting that if we are to support the adoption of regenerative practices it needs to be ‘adaptable’ to their current farming situations.

    Listen now:

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group.

    Episode Takeaways:

    Dr James White pioneered the research into plants farming microbes back in 2013 |Think big, start small, scale fast | There is a massive potential to sequest carbon in soil, farmers just need to know how | The key to driving a shift in farmers thinking of how they can contribute to reversing climate change is the conscious consumer through their buying choices | ‘Create a product or service that people can patronize to make that difference | ’The only thing missing to rapidly progress the research and uptake of carbon sequesting practices in this space is money | You can’t manage what you don’t measure | Farmers need to be remunerated for the carbon they sequest and nutritious food they grow | Hand held nutrition scanning technology is developing rapidly |Market gets what market wants |Create a demand economy lead by consumers to support farmers to grow more nutritious food |Mick uses a number of Johnson Su compost bioreactors to make  fungal dominant compost which he then makes an extract from to spread on his crops | It is essentially a static pile aerobic compost | Once the thermophilic stage is complete worms are then added (vermophilic) | If the same amount of funds that is currently invested in industrial Ag ‘solutions’ was invested in regenerative farming techniques…….. | Truth is first ridiculed, then opposed then accepted as fact | Next generation will want to be part of the solution | Mick attended Landmark in his early 30s. It could be called a personal development course, however is so much more…Charlie has completed the course as well | Landmark Forum is essentially ‘Holding a mirror up against ones self to help identify why one does the things one does ‘….

    Episode Links : 

    Aust soil planners group  – Australia’s largest sustainable group of farmers.

    Quality Agriculture’ – John Kempf

    David Johnson

    ‘The Great Disruption’  – Paul Gilding

    Landmark Forum 

  • Ep 19 | Pt 1 Mick Wettenhall

    In this episode chats with Mick Wettenhall.

     

     

    Charlie caught up with Mick Wettenhall at his property ‘Weemabah’ at Trangie, NSW to dig into his own regenerative journey. Mick most recently has been progressing research into a little know fungi that has an enormous capacity to sequester carbon in the soil. Mick would rather see an agricultural evolution than an agricultural revolution, highlighting that if we are to support the adoption of regenerative practices it needs to be ‘adaptable’ to their current farming situations.

    Listen now:

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group.

     

    Episode Takeaways: 

    Mick is an ex-saddle bronc rider | ‘Agriculture needs to be an evolution not a revolution’ | He was conventional farming at Trangie back in early 2000 | Mick highlights the situation agriculture and the human race is in, that of the ‘Frog boiling in the pot’, the environment and human health is in decline and we are not noticing the rapid decline in both | Mick is farming multi species forage crops and cattle now from a conventional mixed farming and cotton operation prior to him taking over management from his father in-law | The potential to build soil carbon is enormous | The environment is subsiding the cost of food |Family succession was managed by Micks father in law very well, which is not always the experience of farming families | Mick was inspired by a presentation by Tim Flannery in 2006 on climate change | The catalyst for the creation of Soil C Quest was at the Carbon Conference Dubbo 2013 with Mick’s good mate Guy Webb | Peter McGee was the microbiologist who had discovered the particular fungi that Soil C Quest are furthering the research on to sequest significant amounts of Carbon in soil | Carbon is lost to the environment when in the presence of air or water | Carbon found in a micro aggregate was determined to be put in there by fungi and consequent research identified that the fungi could increase C levels by 17 times in 10 weeks in this particular case | melanised endophytic fungi | How do we get main stream agriculture to adopt practices to sequestrate Carbon | Soil C Quest (NFP) is developing an Endophytic innoculum seed dressing | The Soil C Quest big break came when Mick was interviewed on the BBC | Horizons ventures become interested and are now the lead investor | Soil Carbon Company created to develop the product The seed application product is applicable to grazing systems and however needs more research required.

    Episode Links:

    Soul C Quest

    Grassroots video – A story about farmers, the soils they work and a piece of powerful knowledge that nearly slipped through their fingers. Grassroots follows Guy Webb and his friends, unlikely heroes on a quest to bring a genuine climate change solution to the world.

    AFR article on Horizons Ventures & Soil Carbon Co

    Horizons Ventures – Venture capital firm

    Soil Carbon Company

  • Ep 18 | Nicho Plowman

    In this episode chats with Nicho Plowman.

     

     

    Nicho articulately draws together the many parallels between meditation and regenerative agriculture in this long awaited interview with Charlie’s cousin and co-founder of the worlds most used digital meditation platform Insight Timer (20million users).

    The connections with ones health, sense of purpose and the place from where one observes the film of our own lives in the ‘ conscious cinema of our mind’ are highlighted, and the benefits of meditation as an antidote to the treadmill of life are explored by Nicho and Charlie. A life affirming conversation for those who are grappling with the speed and intensity of our times.

    Listen now:

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group.

    Episode Takeaways:

    There are many parallels between the philosophies of meditation and regenerative agriculture | Nicho had a 20 year period of ‘experimentation’ and pushing the boundaries somewhat before finding Vedic meditation 10 years ago | His challenges in that period created learning’s that have enabled him to help others | He developed the Insight timer app which today has almost 20m meditators following it,  over 10,000 meditation / yoga teachers and publishers, a 60,000 track library – and counting… more time spent on Insight each day than all other meditation apps, combined | Nicho just didn’t learn to meditate, he learned to teach it and has made it his life’s work to continue to  help others experience a deeper conscious state ‘When people get up in the morning and go straight to fb where is their motivation?’ | Vedic meditation is practiced twice a day for 20 mins‘ | Our physiology is designed to be in a place where it is balanced and engaging purposefully’ | ‘There is no treatment in the world that we might find externally that can actually do a better job | ‘We have gone into the earth to rip up resources to extend life’ | Meditation is about restoring mental and physical and spiritual health through sitting further back in the conscious cinema of our mind, away from the front row of our lives. Meditation builds resilience to life | The soil is an encapsulation of life itself through its complexity, interplay and interdependence | Biodynamics reconnects people to their food, and inspires people to change behaviour | Do as I do, not as I say…setting an example of behaviours for our children is more important than telling them how to be | Treating the symptom is a ‘proven failed strategy’, were just playing a game of ‘whack a mole’ | ‘Behaviours don’t change until consciousness changes’ | ‘There is creative thinking and solutions out there……. but we’re just sucking up the stuff that’s negative’ | ‘You need to go into the dark to appreciate the light’ | Meditation gives you a reminder of who your truly are | The foundation to the human experience is not just all of this individual external validation. The underlying part of where we came from is our universal Experience as it relates to the moment we were created’

    Episode Links:

    Nicho Plowman – Insight Timer Co Founder and Vedic Meditation Teacher

    Insight Timer –  free meditation app

    Harvest – restaurant, NSW

    Charlie Arnott – IG

    Tim Brown – meditation coach

    The One Wild & Precious Life –  Sarah Wilson

  • Ep 17 | Rachel Ward

    In this episode Charlie talks to actress & director Rachel Ward.

     

     

    A little under thirty-three years ago Rachel and her husband Bryan Brown bought a small farm in the Nambucca Valley on the NSW coast. Until recently they had been managing the farm conventionally but the 2019 devastating bush fires launched her onto a very different trajectory… In this frank interview Rachel talks about how the bushfires were a catalyst for change and how since then she has jumped boots and all onto the regenerative agricultural train, implementing significant changes to her farming practices & lifestyle on the way. She is currently compiling a documentary focusing on the regenerative agricultural movement.

    Listen now:

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group.

    Episode Takeaways:

    I fell in love with the Nambucca valley, NSW, 30 years ago | I grew up on a farm in the Cotswolds in UK | Our farm was managed conventionally and recently we have moved to a more Regenerative approach . It’s not important to me that our children or grandchildren take over and live on the farm, more that they have had exposure to it and can make informed decisions about it in the future. |  I am much more excited about farming now that we are managing it regeneratively. | It’s given her a whole new perspective, a holistic perspective on managing her farm, and the more she gets involved, the more rewards there are. | Farmers have a responsibility beyond their own property boundary, especially in regard to the use of chemicals, as it tends to move out of the landscape via water and air to other farms and ecosystems | NMS is a method of propagating native fungi to use to aim the breakdown of wood and lignified grass. | The Call of the Reed Warbler by Charlie Massy changed her life…….it was full of opportunity and hope, and she was completely electrified by it…just seems like a no brainer…| It doesn’t cost a cent to change a paradigm| Matching personal and business values with landscape needs can be challenging | To sell or not to sell my cows, that is the question, as ones emotional attachment to livestock can sometimes stand in the way of the best decisions for the landscape | Rachel is a big fan and appreciates the value of mentors |  Rachel’s neighbours have joined forces and put their cattle together to move them around the combined properties to improve grazing management and soil health | Rachels property is in Gumbaynggirr  country | Regenerative farmers are enthusiastic and ‘alive’ and ignited to the world and their properties | Farmers have a very serious role to play in the saving of the planet | Rachel supports ‘eaters’ to source and purchase regeneratively grown food, and in doing so contribute to the growth of these practices | The fires of 2019 were a major ‘tension event’ that was a catalyst for my regenerative journey | Rachel is a member of the Land to Market co-op which verifies  the improvement of  landscape through management by annually measuring biological activity and soil composition.

     

    Episode Links: 

    Rachel Ward

    Rachel Ward a- IG  

    Allan Savory Ted talk was totally inspiring to Rachel 

    Allan Savory Institute 

    Kym Kruse Regen Ag  consultant

    Call of the Reed Warbler – Charles Massy

    KLR Marketing 

    Land to Market

  • Ep 16 | Dr Ron Ehrlich

    In this episode Charlie chats with holistic dentist Dr. Ron Ehrlich.

     

     

    Dr Ron Ehrlich is far from a conventional dentist. After a ‘normal’ initial training in dentistry, Dr Ron started to connect the dots between oral hygiene, the influence that diet had on the development of the body,  over all human health and the health of the soil in which that food was  grown. Charlie explores with Ron his journey into his holistic approach to dental care and how regenerative agriculture plays a critical role in providing the quality of food necessary to promote good health. Dr Ron also dives into the  topic of ‘environmental medicine’ and how we can mitigate against various detrimental impacts of chemicals, toxins and electro magnetic frequency radiation. Dr Rons breadth of knowledge provides a compelling perspective on the importance of the connection between dental, human and environmental health.

    Listen now:

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group.

    Episode Takeaways:

    The combination of biology, technology, psychology and freedom drew Ron to dentistry | There’s a huge amount of psychology and intimacy in dentistry | It’s a potentially very stressful environment for both dentist and patient with dentistry related vocations ranking 1,2 and 3 for the worst jobs in the world! | The mouth is connected to multiple organs and areas of the body not generally understood nor considered by the conventional dentistry fraternity | There are many parallels between holistic dentistry and regen agriculture in that it treats the causes not the symptoms, and focus on what one is in control of | Ron’s considered and non- confrontational approach to pushing the boundaries of dentistry has been very effective, reflected of one of his mantra’s ‘Get your house in order before being critical of others’ | Ruminant urine is a beautiful thing as it contains plant growth hormones and stimulates the production of plant based  Pseudomonas syringae  bacterium that floats up into the atmosphere and helps to seed rain! |Regen farming practices and outcomes are a no brainer for Ron who sits outside the agricultural world however is very connected to it via his patients mouths | 5 human stressors are environmental, emotional, nutritional, postural and dental | Gut, oral and soil biome are similar in that the more diverse these environments are the more healthy and resilient they will be | The resource isn’t the problem it’s the management of that resource that matters, there needs to be a holistic context for its management | Change will not come from government or professional organisations, they are slow to accept new ideas, they are protective of their own egos and reputations and they lack common sense | Environmental medicine is one of Dr Ron’s areas of study and advocacy – Only, approx. 5 % of environmental chemicals are formally tested | We are exposed to multiple chemicals over our lifetimes, 140,000 chemicals currently in the world increasing by 2-3,000 every year. We are also exposed to moulds, dust, and out gassing of chemicals |…and Electro Magnetic Frequency (EMF) radiation could be to the 21 st century what lead in petrol and tobacco was to 20th century | Sleep is our built-in, non negotiable life support system, 7-9 hours a night. Tips for listeners regarding environmental toxicities

    Check for mould dust mites bedding
    No technology before or near bed
    No electrical currents near bed

    Computers emit blue light which is in the ultra violet spectrum and impacts our melatonin levels | Building Biologists can help advise on the impacts of EMF in buildings.

    Episode Links : 

    Dr. Ron Ehrlich –  holistic health advocate, dentist, educator, podcaster and an internationally published author.

    Sydney Holistic Dental Centre – run in partnership with his brother Dr. Joshua Ehrlich

    Nourishing Australia  Dr Ron helped found Nourishing Australia with Vicki Poulter, a NFP dedicated to healthy plants, healthy animals, healthy people and a healthy planet

    The Meter Man – A huge range of innovative farm, agricultural, horticultural meters, probes, instruments, tools and resources from David Von Pein

    The Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine ( ACNEM)  in Victoria is a good place for health care professionals

    Low Tox Life Podcast – Alexx Stuart . For families and individuals looking for invaluable info.

     

     

     

     

  • Ep 15 | Murray Prior

    In this episode Charlie chats with Murray Prior.

     

     

    This episode with Murray Prior discusses his unfolding from the corporate sector to becoming a custodian of the land.

    He is gentle spoken and modest about his farming experience yet his thoughtful and deft practices supports his every word. He opens up about the importance of having good mentors and sharing knowledge with peers, that indigenous cultures teach us to care for the land and not own the land, and that the powers of observation are key to understanding country.

    Listen now:

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group.

    Episode Takeaways:
    There was a search for some sort of higher purpose. Something that we could get involved in that frankly, even went past our own lifetimes | The big moment for me was when Charlie (Massy) was with me out in the paddocks. We had this nice moment where we were sitting and he was pointing out different things. He said to me “You know you don’t really own this place” | I’m not a religious person in a traditional sense but tapping into a sense of spirituality for the landscape of the indigenous people who had it before us and get into the feel of the place | I’m 48 years old now and I’m thinking, when this tree is a big tree it will be nearing the end of my time on the planet | I wanted my girls to understand that food doesn’t come in a polystyrene tray with glad wrap on it | One of the things that he does when he comes out is he’ll often go and grab some fresh green Eucalypt and he’ll pull that off as a branch. He’ll teach our girls that if you rub that on your armpit and then rub it on the ground, that’s his way of communicating with his ancestors | One of my big fears is if the girls found out we knew about climate change and knew we did nothing about it | There’s also a part of getting out of nature’s way. I’ve planted thousands of trees but there’s natural regen going on all the time | I think that being relatively new to the industry you don’t have the memory bank of seasons. While you might have some landscape literacy, you don’t have season literacy

    Episode Links:
    Call of the Reed Warbler – Charles Massy
    Charles Massy – TED talk Regenerative Agriculture
    Paul House – Ngambri Country Elder
    Welcome to Country – Paul House
    Aboriginal Smoking Ceremony
    Bruce Pascoe – Author, Ted Talk on Dark Emu
    Dark Emu – Bruce Pascoe
    Dark Emu for Kids – Bruce Pascoe
    Aboriginal Land Council – Explanation and Index of Councils by State
    The Barn Accommodation, Nguuurruu – Murray Prior’s Farm
    Dr Zach Bush – Author, Health Consultant and Environmentalist
    Hannamino Farm – Charlie Arnott
    Biodynamics – A Definition
    Biodynamics – Cow Manure Preparations
    Mickey Robertson – Glenmore House 

  • Ep 14 | Darren Robertson

    Charlie interviewed chef Darren Robertson of the Three Blue Ducks fame at The Farm at Byron Bay.

     

     

    Darren moved there 5 years ago after, amongst other things, being the head chef at the world famous Tetsuya restaurant in Sydney. Darren also speaks frankly about the pressures and strains of the hospitality industry, his initial interest in cooking, what he looks for in staff, and his gratitude for his life’s journey thus far. This is a conversation that will interest food lovers, farmers, the hospitality industry and everyone in between.

    Listen now:

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group.

    Episode Takeaways :

    Establishing the Three Blue Ducks restaurant at The Farm at Byron Bay was a massive step up and into the world of farming and sourcing fresh produce directly from producers | Creative ‘root to flower’ cooking with food straight from the paddock | Australian salads are the best in the world! | Marco Pierre White was Darren’s first culinary inspiration | Moved to Australia to work at the world famous Tetsuya in Sydney and fell in love with the food scene | Surfing was a game changer for keeping Darren focused and not falling down the rabbit hole of the late night hospitality industry | Advice for chefs in the time of Covid 19 | Hospitality industry mental health as a global crisis | Chefs evolving appreciation for food and its origins | Advice to a young Darren Robertson – put away 10% of income for Future opportunities and a rainy day, and be grateful today for what you have | Creating a community of passionate staff is a big part of their success | There’s no where to hide in a kitchen!  |The Biodynamic practice of peppering to rid rabbits of an area | Darren’s parting advice- be kind, and give it a crack!

    Episode Links:

    Darren Robertson – IG 

    Three Blue Ducks 

    The Farm – Byron Bay

    Tetsuyas – Restaurant

    Marco Pierre White – chef  / restranteur

     

     

  • Ep 13 | Peter Windrim

    This episode sees Charlie sit down with the impressively bearded and deep thinking Peter Windrim.

     

     

    Peter is a biodynamic winemaker and farmer, creative director, graphic designer and photographer. His contribution to agriculture has evolved by opening a wine bar in Byron Bay to encourage community and create conversation around natural wine. Having lived and worked on his family’s biodynamic vineyard in the Hunter Valley, he has philosophised his own definition of the practice which he explains with absolute conviction. He is a heart felt voice that places importance on knowing yourself and your vocation.

    Listen now:

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group.

    Episode Takeaways:
    I think there’s so much confusion there and I’ve been guilty myself of lip service and using other peoples words. So many people care about it and get lost in the beautifully, philosophical, touchy-feely nature of what biodynamics is | Rudolf Steiner, the father of biodynamics “Sulphur is what the spirit moistens its fingers with into the physical” | Thankfully now there are a lot of people who have caught the wave of the climate change movement & who have cottoned on to the importance of soil | I think there are certain products, the luxury consumables like wine, that people care a bit less about because they’re in it for a good time | Biodynamics is sympathetic agriculture but I felt lonely on the farm. Community is the backbone of what I do. I’m going to build a bar and build a community around natural wine | Wine was hijacked by the aristocrats and scientist 60-70 years ago. They gave it all this new language and judging shows based on clarity and purity and all of this stuff that wine wasn’t, and that farming isn’t, nor should it be | Biodynamics is like  the global pandemic, the more you learn to work with it, the more power it has | It sounds simple but if the farm looks good, aesthetically pleasingly good, you’ve done it right. And if you have pride in what you do, you’ll make it right | Everything that we do, informs the next thing that we do. We get so boxed in with where we should be….“No I can’t change career”….”no I’d have to study that first”…it’s such a shame that we feel like we can’t evolve with the fabric of our old selves | You’ve got to know what you know. People need to ask more questions

    Episode Links :

    Krinklewood Vineyard – Hunter Valley
    https://www.krinklewood.com/

    Supernatural – Wine Bar Byron Bay
    https://supernaturalbyronbay.com/

    Rudolf Steiner – Father of Biodynamics/Philosopher
    https://www.rudolfsteinerweb.com/

    Terroir in Wine – A Definition
    https://winefolly.com/tips/terroir-definition-for-wine/

    Organic & Biodynamic Wine – Wine Australia Education
    https://www.wineaustralia.com/education/organic-and-biodynamic-wine

    Radionics in Agriculture
    http://www.keyscollege.com/agriculture-and-horticulture/

    Nicolas Joly – Godfather of biodynamic wine/author
    https://coulee-de-serrant.com/en/home/

    Matthew Evans – farmer, author, The Gourmet Farmer, Fat Pig Farm
    https://fatpig.farm/

  • Ep 12 | Martin Royds

    In episode 12 Charlie interviews regenerative farmer Martin Royds.

     

     

    In this insightful interview with Martin Royds, he and Charlie discuss personal experiences relating to the polarising differences of conventional and holistic farming. As a fifth generation farmer, Martin evolved the family cattle property in Braidwood, NSW to biodynamic practices with a goal to reconnect city and country.  Together, they highlight the importance of economic influence in regenerative agriculture and solve the monetary concern that naïve consumers often have when purchasing nutrient rich food. There is an underlying subject that generational farmers have shifted their inherited knowledge over time to be in harmony with the environment and part of that comes from acknowledging the oversights of the past. Yet, the humility is in the fact that we are constantly learning.

    Listen now:

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group.

    Episode Takeaways:
    The epiphany was watching your land blowing away and thinking you need to do something different. Tried something different, the chemical experiment, and that was even worse |  Australian farmers have been extremely good at surviving in decreasing income and increasing costs. The difference now is setting a goal of where I want to be environmentally and socially and making every decision to reflect that  |  There is one kilo of glyphosate being used per every human on the planet. Our ancestors will look back at us and say “how on earth did you think that pouring that stuff onto the country was a good idea”  |  None of us looked at what was happening environmentally, we were asking how long it would take to get our money back  |  Most of our soils had 3% carbon and we mined it back to 1%  |  You can use double entry bookkeeping to fix the problem as soon as you add in environmental capital  |  Most farmers who are generational farmers find it hard to get out of “this is what my father or grandfather did” | Sadly, humans are one of the few species who leave the land behind them in a worse state  |  When people understand nutrient density in organic vegetables they will realise they can’t afford the cheap option because its poisoning me  |   My goal is that supermarkets will have to label their products with the amount of nutrients in those products. Ultimately that could lead to listing the amount of chemicals used to make it also |

    Episode Links:
    Nutri Soil – Biological Spray Solution
    Carbon in Soil – An explanation
    Double-Entry Bookkeeping – An explanation
    Charlie Massy – Author/Farmer
    Pennie Scott – The Bush Goddess
    Nutrient Dense crops – An explanation
    Carotene in Food – Definition
    Land to Market Australia – Organisation
    Joel Salatin – Farmer, lecturer, author
    Peter Andrews – Regenerative Agriculturalist
    Christine Jones – Amazing Carbon
    Dr Maarten Staper – BioLogic AgFood
    Alison Pouliot – Fungi Workshop, photographer

  • Ep 11 | Sarah Wilson

    Charlie’s guest for this episode is Sarah Wilson.

     

     

    Sarah Wilson, the New York Times best selling author, former journo and retired intrepid traveler shares her regenerative journey in a frank, open and honest chat with Charlie.

    The setting for the interview is Sarah’s Bondi apartment, her sanctuary and place she now calls home. Sarah recounts her fascinating story and explains what it is to finally put down roots. Charlie and Sarah share an open dialogue which touches on what regenerative agriculture means to Sarah, as she talks about the fragile state of mankind today in terms of diet, mental illness /disease, and the urgent need for realignment – a subject matter close to Sarah’s heart and aptly the focus of her new book: ‘This One Wild and Precious Life: A hopeful path forward in a fractured world’,  which has just hit the shelves.

    Put aside some time and delve in and listen to this life-changing episode now!

    Listen now:

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group.

    Episode Takeaways:

    Every community needs an esoteric spinster wandering around the street | I interpret odd as not being necessarily bad. I I rebelled against some of the thinking around my upbringing however I maintained many of the sustainable minimalist principles. | I probably did a bunch of things that scared the living daylights of my parents. | It generally takes a slap down for those of us who have done a very big pivot in life, to do that pivot. | I believe when you have a longing in your soul.. Life will join you.  Life will corporate with you to steer you in direction. | (Talking about her auto-immune disease) – Gets your ego and scrapes you through the mud. | I had made a commitment, in the absence of any framework, into how to live life on this planet… If I hear a mention  of something three times in a row, I must act. | Meditation was a big part of my shift. It was being stripped bare, and being left with nothing. | Reduced down to the two suitcases.. And then the rest of my life started| I was aware of how off kilter we were  with our food system.. How much really basic logic we have managed to disrupt. We have created hyper normal problems. | There is a lot of sensible common sense stuff that  really we only have to look at the way our great grandparents to get an indication of what a really good sustainable life on this planet looks like. | I have been able to heal from multiple stress related / autoimmune disease I believe and reverse a lot of the markers because of the way I live – in nature, in dirt, in trees. | I describe a serious anxiety order as like carrying a shallow bowl of water around for the rest of my life. | I am feeling very overwhelmed very scared about what is going on in the world. | (talking about her book) I am reframing my anxiety through a new lens.

    Episode Links : 

    www.sarahwilson.com  – Sarah’s website Sarah Wilson website 

    I Quit Sugar Series – author Sarah Wilson

    First, We make the Beast Beautiful  – author Sarah Wilson

    This One Wild and Precious Life: A hopeful path forward in a Fractured World author Sarah Wilson

    Nicho Plowman – Vedic meditation teacher 

    The Conscious Club – Transformational Learning and Lifestyle centre

    Tim Brown – meditator

    Hashimoto’s disease – information 

    Dr James Hollis – jungian psychoanalysis. 

    Food Inc –  Joel Salatin movie

    Dr. Chris Kresser –   renowned expert, leading clinician, and top educator in the fields of Functional Medicine and ancestral health.

    Active Farmers  – country farmers/ riding bikes. 

    Chris Eggert – Norco / dairy farmer

    Nietzsche thinking –  german philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche  

    Sils Maria – Town in Switzerland. 

    Heidi – book and later film

    William Wordsworth – English poet

    David Whyte – Irish poet

    Victor Frankel – Austrian neurologist & psychologist  

    Man’s Search for Meaning – Victor Frankel author   

    Fostering in Australia  – resources 

    Sir Ken Robinson – Ted Talk  

    Steiner Education – resources

     

     

     

  • Ep 10 | Pt 2 Charles Massy

    Part 2 of Charlie’s interview with Charles Massy.

     

     

    In part 2 of this interview, Charlie and Charles detail the difference between Complex Adaptive Systems and the Industrial Method of farming. Charles’ resonates his free flowing insight into the direct relationship between farming, food systems, human health and its effect on the mental health of ourselves and our children. They summarise the consequences of our increasing divorcement from nature and the job description of a regenerative farmer.

    Charles Massy is a devotee for regenerative farming and patriarch for land care advocates in Australia. He is a farmer, author and storyteller who has brought life to the ideals of so many scholars and forward thinkers that are fundamental to our human interaction on the ecosystem. He has deep empathy for nature that is in sync with land management.

    Listen now:

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group.

    Episode Takeaways:

    Emergent Properties are the name they’ve given to elements within the system that will emerge when it needs to adapt. The solution lies within  |  If you have a healthy environment and you degrade it too far it will go to a stage that it’s almost impossible to get it back  |  In industrial farms you have drug addicted plants waiting for their fertiliser dose  |  Modern industrial food is causing all of these diseases causing havoc on human health  |  Most indigenous women in hunter-gatherer societies can identify at least 500 food or medicinal plant  in their landscape  |  We now find devastating evidence that the world’s most widely used herbicide is in almost all modern foods  |  For every child in Australia under aged under six, only 1 in 4 has ever climbed a tree or a rock  |  The solutions are simple: grow and eat healthy food and get out into nature as much as you can |

    Episode Links : 

    Holistic Management – Alan Savoury
    Nourishment – Fred Provenza
    Last Child In The Woods – Richard Louv
    Di Haggerty – Cropping Farmers
    A Thousand Days Program
    Zach Bush – Holistic Health and Wellbeing
    Patagonia Provisions – Yvonne Chouinard

  • Ep 10 | Pt 1 Charles Massy

    In the first episode of Series 2, Charlie interviews Charles Massy

     

     

    The introduction to Season 2 is a long overdue interview with Charles Massy,  devotee for regenerative farming and patriarch for land care advocates in Australia. He is a farmer, author and story teller who has brought life to the ideals of many scholars and forward thinkers that are fundamental to our human interaction on the ecosystem. He has deep empathy for nature that is in sync with land management.

    In part one of a two part interview, Charles is sat in his Severn Park home, unravelling his journey into farming. A profound love of nature from a young age helped his transition to inherent the family farm that he converted to regenerative agriculture, all while studying a degree in Ecology and a PhD in Human Ecology. He describes his “head cracking” moments into understanding the need to develop better practices to nurture the health of the ancient Australian landscape. His holistic, pragmatic words are like a wise father who the world over should come to hear.

    Listen now:

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey Podcast Facebook Group.

    Episode Takeaways:

    Europeans came here under huge misunderstandings of how this land would behave  |  There were probably 15000 to 25000  years of indigenous landscape management before we came  |  If we are going to talk about humans on earth we have to understand how they impact our natural environment  |  The concept of we, humans and sustaining our environment is inseparable  |  Our cognitive function tends to lock in that world view and it takes a lot of disturbing to crack it open  |  There are excellent indigenous thinkers writing in this space. It takes a lot to get your head around but wow, we’re in kindergarten  |

    Episode Links: 

    Aldo Leopold – Ecologist, philosopher (website)

    Call of the Reed Warbler – Charles Massy

    Breaking The Sheep’s Back – Charles Massy

    The Australian Merino – Charles Massy

    RCS – Course

    Holistic Management – Course

    Project Drawdown – Paul Kawken

    Dark Emu – Bruce Pascoe

    Fire Country – Victor Steffensen

    Sand Talk – Tyson Yunkaporta

  • Ep 9 | Maree Lowes

    In the final episode of Series 1, Charlie’s guest is Maree Lowes or ‘Dirt Girl’.

     

     

    Maree chats about her current studies and passion for disaster resilience & sustainable development and what she believes can be done to help safe guard the planet & mankind for future generations…Maree and Charlie wrap up their conversation with an exciting announcement about a new collaboration that they are hard at work on!

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways :

    You can have all the facts in the world but if people haven’t connected with their hearts, with what it is we are trying to protect then it is really hard to sustain any behavioural change and to keep it going | We are as big and as small as the largest thing and the smallest things in the universe | A big principle of regenerative agriculture is learning to listen to the land and respecting the power of biodiversity and systems and the power that nature has | So early on in life, we are having the wrong conversations about what food offers us | (Talking about the Masters Maree is currently studying towards)…My heart is a little calmer as I feel that I am going to the crux of some of the work that needs to be done. Looking at the systems that are in place and why they’re not serving and why they’re not creating a resilient regenerative future for us | The fires on the back of the long drought…has brought it home to Aussies that idea of a drying and warming climate and the outcomes of that…isn’t a solely academic thing any more. It’s real | When the system is still going in the opposite direction it makes people question why they should make changes | Going forward, we need to learn to listen to ourselves again. This is going to be really important | The importance of staying connected to purpose and community are incredibly valuable | (On Charlie) I had a fan-girl moment when I found you that you were a Landcare Ambassador ! 

    Episode Links :

    Maree Lowes – Website 

    Jillamatong – Martin Royds property , Braidwood, NSW 

    Beyond the Brink – Peter Andrews, Farmer/ educator/ author

    Tarwyn Park Training – Natural Sequence Farming / Stuart Andrews

    Dark Emu – Bruce Pascoe 

    Climate Refugees – Definition

     Master of Disaster Resilience and Sustainable Development Program – Information 

    Radical Hope – Richard Lear author

    Psychological flexibility – Overview

    BYO Bottle Campaign – Jack Johnson/ Maree Lowes 

    Time banking – Definition 

    Landcare Australia Organisation 

    Bob Hawke Landcare Award 

    National Bushfire & Climate  Summit – June 2020

    Building Bridges to Boorowa – Landcare Gateway Project

    Mulloon Creek Institute 

    The Farm – Tom & Emma Lane / Byron Bay

    Three Blue Ducks – Restaurant / The Farm 

    Pocket City Farms – Food Education & Community

    Clayton Donovan – Chef 

    Joost Bakker – Activist and founder of Melbourne’s first zero waste restaurant

    Zach Bush – Physician & educator

    Carbon8 – Helen McCosker

    NRAD – 14th Feb annually

    NRAD & Kelly Jones 

    The Castle – Film 

    Rachel Ward – Film director / beef farmer 

    Listen now:

  • Ep 8 | pt 2 | David Marsh

    This is the episode (2 of 2 ) Charlie continues his chat with David Marsh, a stalwart of the Australian regen movement.

     

     

    In what is an enlightening and philosophical dialogue David takes us on his regenerative journey and steps us through the course of events that triggered David’s change in approach. In Part 2 David delves deeper into the psychology of change and offers advice to those looking to start the transition

    Listen now:

    .

    Episode Takeaways :

    What was growing in the paddocks early 1970? I didn’t know…compared to now, when I am absolutely obsessed with it | It was the time of showing that we had mastery over nature…a lot to do with subsidies given after the war…there was a Super Phosphate bounty…you were paid to put Super out | The mantra out West was sell and repent but sell | In Boorowa the mantra was hang on and hope you get lucky | We noticed trees dying. Mary and I went out and did some counts in a few paddocks where there were quite a few trees. We calculated that at the rate they were dying that in 70 years there wouldn’t be many alive. That was the embryo and the awakening of an ecological conscience | We had no idea what we were doing to be honest and thought we were forming a group because there were a lot of trees dying in Boorowa…but the trees were actually an indication of a whole lot of other things that were going on…we were ecologically blind | Corona 19 has made people reconsider how they have been living and how dependent they are on so many things that are high energy products | I used to see myself as an agent responsible for healing the land…there is nothing wrong with this but now I see myself as someone who is observing the landscape that is healing itself. 

    Links 

    The Cattle Crash  – 1974

    Ian Armstrong – Rural Action Movement 

    1982 drought NSW 

    Joan Kirner – Conservation Minister (1985 – 88) instrumental in formation of first Landcare Groups.

    Andrew Campbell – Formerly manager of the Potter Farm Plan initiative, first Landcare Coordinator and now CEO of the ACIAR ( Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research) 

    ACF – Australian Conservation Foundation 

    NFF – National Farmers Federation 

    Bob Hawke – Landcare involvement 

    Boorowa Community Landcare Group – History 

    Bertigan ( QLD)  Catchment Landcare Group / Gympie Landcare – History 

    An Agricultural Testament – Author Arthur Howard

    A Silent Spring – Author Rachel Carsons

    Listen now:

  • Ep 8 | Pt 1 | David Marsh

    This is the episode (1 of 2 ) Charlie chats to David Marsh, a stalwart of the Australian regen movement.

     

     

    In what is an enlightening and philosophical dialogue David takes us on his regenerative journey and steps us through the course of events that triggered David’s change in approach. In Part 1 we learn about how Landcare Australia came to be and David provides a valuable insight into Australian agriculture over the last 50 years.

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways :

    What was growing in the paddocks early 1970? I didn’t know…compared to now, when I am absolutely obsessed with it | It was the time of showing that we had mastery over nature…a lot to do with subsidies given after the war…there was a Super Phosphate bounty…you were paid to put Super out | The mantra out West was sell and repent but sell | In Boorowa the mantra was hang on and hope you get lucky | We noticed trees dying. Mary and I went out and did some counts in a few paddocks where there were quite a few trees. We calculated that at the rate they were dying that in 70 years there wouldn’t be many alive. That was the embryo and the awakening of an ecological conscience | We had no idea what we were doing to be honest and thought we were forming a group because there were a lot of trees dying in Boorowa…but the trees were actually an indication of a whole lot of other things that were going on…we were ecologically blind | Corona 19 has made people reconsider how they have been living and how dependent they are on so many things that are high energy products | I used to see myself as an agent responsible for healing the land…there is nothing wrong with this but now I see myself as someone who is observing the landscape that is healing itself. 

    Links 

    The Cattle Crash  – 1974

    Ian Armstrong –  Rural Action Movement 

    1982 drought NSW 

    Joan Kirner  – Conservation Minister ( 1985 – 88 ) instrumental in formation of first Landcare Groups.

    Andrew Campbell – Formerly manager of the Potter Farm Plan initiative, first Landcare Coordinator and now CEO of the ACIAR ( Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research) 

    ACF – Australian Conservation Foundation 

    NFF – National Farmers Federation 

    Bob Hawke – Landcare involvement 

    Boorowa Community Landcare Group –  History 

    Bertigan ( QLD)  Catchment Landcare Group / Gympie Landcare – History 

    An Agricultural Testament  – Author Arthur Howard

    A Silent Spring – Author Rachel Carsons

    Listen now:

  • Ep 7 | Lorraine Gordon

    In this episode Charlie speaks with Lorraine Gordon, Regenerative Agriculture’s First Lady!

     

     

    Lorraine takes us back to her early twenty’s when she first stepped onto the land, and her formidable journey from this point on. We cover off on some of her most important career milestones including her recent project the launch of the world’s first Regenerative Agricultural degree course at SCU. We talk Australia’s positioning on the world stage and also the regen. ag definition debate. 

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways:

    The power of collaborating and working together. Farmers are always going to be stronger when they pull resources and work together | RCS and Terry McCosker have done more for farming and grazing in this country than anyone else that I know | Regenerative Ag. is a whole way of thinking, it’s holistic thinking, it’s questioning and it’s a different journey for everybody who takes it. It’s not a prescriptive journey | Nobody owns the term regenerative, regenerate or regen. It’s not something you can own | There is no point giving money to farmers for a hay shed, if there’s no hay to put in the shed! | We’ve had drought, horrendously hot fires, now floods… and now we’re just waiting for the locust plague! |Our soils are the oldest soils in the world…we shouldn’t farm the way Europe farms. We need to farm the Australian way | The world is watching us. The world watched Australia burn | As a consumer, don’t sit there and say that I will become a vegan / vegetarian because livestock production is bad…that is coming from a point of ignorance because not all livestock production is bad | Farmers are the ultimate in action research!

    Links :

    Lorraine Gordon – 2020 NSW Australian of the Year nominee

    Ebor Beef Inc – Lorraine is the co-founder

    Regenerative Agriculture Alliance – Lorraine is the founder

    Yaraando Eco Lodge – Lorraine is the director

    Moffart Falls Pty Ltd – Lorraine is the director 

    Regenerative Agriculture Course – Southern Cross University / Lorraine is the Strategic director of projects at SCU

    Wayne Upton – cattle stalwart

    RCS – Resource Consultancy Services / Founder Terry McCosker 

    Farming Together –  pilot program for farming resources run by Southern Cross University 2016 – 2018

    National Marine Science Centre – SCU 

    Maia Grazing – Online grazing management software

    Listen now:

  • Ep 6 | Jim Gerrish

    In this episode Charlie chats to the American grazier & educator Jim Gerrish.

     

     

    Jim takes us on his regenerative journey and recalls the moment, when he realised that the aroma of freshly turned/ ploughed ground he had always liked growing up  was in fact the smell of the earth dying…this proved to be the turning point in his life. Jim’s  journey is a captivating one which touches on human health & diet, food definitions, changing farm practices and a whole lot more. 

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways

    We don’t need feedlots. We just need people who have grazing management skills to take a pasture and turn it into delightful beef | In research we don’t call it  a cow pie/cow pat, it’s a SEE…a Single Excretory Event! | We don’t need new knowledge, we need to be applying what we already know | The whole idea that beef cattle are destroying the environment is only tied to feedlot phase of it | The methane thing is a real red herring with grazing cattle, feedlots it’s a problem. It’s the production model not the ruminant animals that are the problem | Grass feeds the grass, grass feeds the soil, then grass can feed the livestock| Human health is instrincically linked to soil health. 

     

    To start a dialogue and converse more about topics raised in this podcast, please visit The Regenerative Journey podcast facebook group.

    Links

    Jim Gerrish – American Grazing Lands LLC  

    Maia Grazing – Grazing management tool 

    Dr. James Anderson – Scottish agriculturist in 1700’s

    Diana Rodgers – Sustainable Dish

    Sacred Cow – Film project led by Diana Rodgers 

    Listen now:

  • Ep 5 | Khory Hancock

    In this episode Charlie chats to Khory Hancock AKA ‘The Environmental Cowboy’.

     

     

    Khory talks candidly about his regenerative journey thus far & how the environmental cowboy persona came to be, including who & what inspires him. We delve into the psychology of change,  the importance of learning more about Australia’s indigenous roots as we look to safeguard our environment for generations to come & the role regenerative agriculture has to play in this.

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways

    Regenerative agriculture is really a journey of self discovery. Our beliefs and values have come from Traditional Australian practices which has been Primarily  about dominating nature. Regenerative farming is less about ego, less about domination and more about being aligned with nature | We have gone from culture to culture to generation to generation with the same beliefs and values and people don’t like change. But change is happening whether we like it or not  | We are at a point in history where we need to come together rather than divide | One person on their own cannot make significant difference but 7 billion acting together as one can make a big difference | When we talk about country. We talked about country as a thing. The indigenous when they talk about country, it’s so much deeper | It’s quite fearful for me to put myself out there like that. It’s nerve wracking! | Before I started the Environmental Cowboy I was definitely not free. I was afraid of people’s judgement. I was afraid of failing. I was scared of rejection, but I faced those fears…but now I feel free.

    Links

    Khory Hancock / The Environmental Cowboy – website

    The Environmental Cowboy – IG & FB

    The Environmental Cowboy – You Tube

    National Regenerative Agriculture day – 14th Feb annually

    David Ward – agronomist

    Charles Massy – author of ‘The Call of the Reed Warbler’

    Shane Fitzsimmons – Former NSW RFS Commissioner

    Celeste Barber – comedian

    David Marsh –  regenerative agriculture farmer

    Tony Robbins – life & business strategist

    Al Gore – US politician & environmentalist

    Bruce Lee – Chinese american actor, martial artist & philosopher

    Ben Brooksby

    – the Naked Farmer

    Derek & Kirilly Blomfield – The Conscious Farmer

    Building Bridges to Boorowa – Boorowa Comunity Landcare Group project

    Holly Richmond – writer

    Byron Bay Grass Fed –  beef producer

    Matthew Hussey – relationships coach

    Listen now:

  • Ep 4 | Sara Schmude

    In this episode Charlie chats with Sara Schmude,  regenerative agricultures golden girl.

     

    Sara’s 15 year relationship with the Landcare movement has played a pivital role in inspiring her interest in regenerative farming & the educating of children and adults alike. She launched the ‘Regenerative Agriculture Group’ facebook page in late 2018 and now boasts a global membership. Sara talks natural capital, and the definition of regenerative agriculture before delving deeper into the catalysts and kick starts that made up her regenerative journey.

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways

    Growing up on the land in the 70’s & 80’s being a female. Not recognised as someone who would be a land manager. Took it for granted that she wasn’t going to be on the land. Continued to ask questions – mustering became my second name | The calibre of people who are in this space is exceptional. Have got to a point in their life that they want to change. Their approach is really refreshing | A tribute to the boom in my garden is the Biodynamic compost. I feel connected with my garden. It feeds me every day, nurtures my soul. It’s integral | Good general advice-Manage for what you want. Not for what you don’t want | I just think it’s a boom time for agriculture | Working with nature. You start to find these rhythms , things start to function, mineral and water cycles. Really important. When we talk about adapting to our climate, we have to adapt these systems, we have to adapt our minds | If you raise your  soil carbon content by 1% you are drawing down 122 tonne per Ha of CO2 into your soils. So that has the potential to generate 122 ACCU per hectare | The government would be very wise to get as many people on board the carbon sequestration train, through education and empowering them to leverage their natural capital by drawing down the carbon in the soil | Regen ag is just open. It’s inclusive and easy to access. 

    Links

    Regenerative Agriculture  – facebook page 

     

    Impact Ag – Sara’s natural capital interest

     

    Introduction to Biodynamics Workshop – Biodynamics2024 & Charlie 

     

    Thalgarrah education centre, Armidale NSW

     

    Frog Dreaming  

     

    Inside Out Management – Brian Whelberg

     

    Hand For the Land – Graeme Hand

     

    Soil C Quest – Guy Webb

     

    KLR Marketing – Graham Rees

     

    Regenerative Agriculture book – Richard Perkins

     

    A Sand County Almanac – Aldo Leopold

     

    The Rodale Book of Composting – Rodale Institute

     

    Amazing Carbon – Dr. Christine Jones

     

    Maia Grazing Day and Grazing Systems

     

    Biocast – Vermicast bio stimulant product

     

    Regen Ag definition 

    \

  • Ep 3 | Damon Gameau

    In this episode Charlie chats to award winning film director & change maker Damon Gameau.

     

     

    He delves into his own Regenerative Journey, from his early career as an actor, and the pivotal moments that were the catalyst for his change in direction. They talk Covid-19 and the opportunities the pandemic is providing to reshape redundant mindsets, including the role of regenerative agriculture has to play in a new paradigm. No chat with Damon is complete without of course, delving into his 2040 film as we learn more about Damon’s inspirational fact based dreaming approach.

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways

    It felt like a noble job to be playing another human being.. but then, you have to juxtapose that with paying the bills | At the time I had really spent a lot of effort cultivating this persona of myself, of this rollie smoking, velvet jacket wearing actor.. who just loved the first 3 months of relationship, who just then ran for the hills | People who are genuinely doing amazing things.. like trying to help the planet, we just don’t have any accolades or awards ceremonies for those people.. this has always been baffling to me | We are so controlled by the story that we tell ourselves | With Covid-19 all those illusionary forms and structures have suddenly dissolved and we have seen how fragile our system is | Off the back of 2040, there has been so much travel with that…I just burnt myself out, traveling every week. It’s been quite a revelation to stop…to be at home | This is a moment – a rare moment, that the door is slightly a jar…This is the moment that we have been waiting for. Suddenly we have pressed stop on the system. In this pause moment, it’s the chrysalis, it’s the caterpillar going into the cocoon | All these key different elements of our biodiversity, they are so under the pump right now. Going back to normal (post Covid), is a suicide mission | We cant be outsourcing everything overseas anymore, the current system is not robust. It’s a 20th century model that’s trying to deal with 21st century problems. We have to adapt | Regenerative agriculture is absolutely the most exciting ‘bio tech’ that is emerging this century | All the magic is under our feet – it’s just waiting patiently, calmly | Be kind – don’t over think this, as a race we do actually get on. We do care about each other. 

    Links

    Whats your 2040 ? – website for Damon’s 2040 film (released 2019)

    Kate Raworth – Uk economist 

    Charles Massy – author of ‘Call of the Reed Warbler’

     Regen Ag course – Southern Cross University

    Martin Royds – Jillamatong, Braidwood

    Impossible foods – plant based food co.

    Sustainable Dish – Diane Rogers. 

     Polyface farms – Joel Salatin

    Raymond Williams – quote 

    The Intrepid Foundation – improving livelihoods through sustainable travel experiences

    Tim Flannery – Australian palaeontologist

    The Living Mountain – book by Nan Shepherd 

    The Future we Choose – book by  Christiana Figueres

    Fantastic Fungi – film

    The Tim Ferriss show  – podcast 

    Landmark Worldwide– transformation course / personal development 

    Listen now:

  • Ep 2 | Joel Salatin

    In this episode Charlie interviews American farmer and leading regenerative agriculture advocate Joel Salatin.

     

     

    Joel recounts his Regenerative Journey from his formative years as the son of a chicken farming accountant in Venezuela through the rehabilitation of his family farm in Swoope, Virginia, to the prolific supplier of fresh food to his customers and legendary public speaker. He talks about the importance of communication, authenticity and also about how highly he regards Australia within the regenerative agriculture space.

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways

    We moved forward in faith not in fear | If you stop fighting nature, and you see nature as a partner. Hand in hand going in the same direction, it costs a lot less financially and ecologically | Communication is typically not taught in ‘Farming 101’ | Farmers have to be experts in lots of things. There is a lot of talent within the farming community but a lot of time this isn’t leveraged. There are many number of things that farmers can do. It is a tragedy, a societal indictment, that we have created this mystic of the peasant farmer | My sense is that Australia is a very fragile landscape but it’s also a very wealthy country. As such the world’s eyes are on Australia to wear the responsibility seriously and continue to lead the world in regenerative practices.

    Links

    Polyface Farm – Joel’s farm

    Joel Salatin Nutrisoil ‘Sustainable abundance’ conference – 21/22nd May 2019, Victoria, AUS

    ‘Polyfaces’ documentary (2015) – filmed over 4 years by Darren Docherty and Lisa Heenan.

    The Top Five Regrets of the Dying – A Life Transformed by the Dearly Departing – Bronrie Ware

    Sex begins in the kitchen – Kevin Leman

    Albert Einstein –  Einstein said  definition of insanity ‘doing the same thing and hoping for a different result’. 

    Steven Covey – Circles of influence 

    BEEP (Boorowa Education Excursion Program) –  Boorowa Community Landcare Group

     

    See you at the top – Zig Ziglar 

     

    Alan Savoury – Zim ecologist (Alan Savory Institute) 

     

    The lean farm – Ben Hartman

    Listen now:

  • Ep 1 | Charlie Arnott

    In the first episode Charlie delves into his very own  ‘regenerative journey’.

     

     

    He provides listeners with an insight into his early farming years, the defining moments that finally propelled him to a new way of thinking and some of the key milestones that Charlie has reached on the way.

    Listen now:

    Episode Takeaways

    We were not running the farm with an entire view of the business or the impact we were having on the environment. The farm was a basket of resources that we could use…there was water, there was grass, there was soil, air, there was sunshine…and we essentially mined it…We were farming as we always had, we were doing as our neighbours did and we were farming in a way that we thought was appropriate | I had a cheque book in one hand and my ‘how to’ agronomic hand book in the other. We went pretty hard, burnt a lot diesel…Really every morning I was waking up and I was killing stuff. That was what one did. If one was farming one was unwittingly battling nature | I needed to bust paradigms.. I needed to change the paddock between my ears so that I could actually do things differently on the ground…I needed to change my attitude and to do that I was needing to ask myself better questions | Starting to use Biodynamics…That alone gave me some structure. It really resonated with me. It helped me understand my new relationship with nature and the context of that in farming, in business and in our lives | In farming, the practices and principals of farming are so entwined with oneself, ones personality ones purpose. If we are doing things in a way that is effective and productive and purposeful then we are also  building ourselves and defining and refining who we are in this world, not just in the agricultural space, and in the world of being a person, our role in mankind in humanity.

    Links

    Profiting from drought – 1 day Course  run by RCS ( Resource Consulting Services) 

    RCS – Grazing for Profit

    Holistic Management Land to Market Australia is a program run by the Australian Holistic Management Cooperative Limited. Uniquely, this project is being driven by producers and farmers themselves.

    Biodynamics – what is Biodynamics

    Biodynamics workshops – new website w/ info on workshops launching soon!

    Listen now: